Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February 26, 2017

Canada conservationist warns of 'cyber poaching'

Photographers, poachers and eco-tour operators are in the crosshairs of a Canadian conservationist who warns that tracking tags are being hacked and misused to harass and hunt endangered animals. Steven Cooke, a biology professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, says that the very tools used by scientists to study and protect animals and fish are bing hijacked to do just the opposite. Cooke, the Canada research chair of environmental science and biology, is the lead author of a paper published this week in the journal Conservation Biology.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lYIcIP
via RO Water Filter

Real-life subject of 'Hidden Figures' receives standing ovation at Oscars

Katherine Johnson, one of the NASA research mathematicians portrayed in the Oscar-nominated film "Hidden Figures," received a standing ovation at the Academy Awards on Sunday. Appearing at the Dolby Theatre, Johnson, now 98 years old, thanked the crowd for their support.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lVvYQF
via RO Water Filter

New urgency in fight to restore Florida Everglades

Rising seas, polluted coastlines and the specter of more frequent droughts and storms have lent new urgency to efforts to restore the ecosystem of the Florida Everglades, the largest freshwater wetland in the United States. The Everglades' sawgrasses, swamps, tree islands and mangroves are home to a host of fascinating species, from American alligators to endangered hook-billed birds known as snail kites to invasive Burmese pythons. Until now, the world's largest ecosystem restoration project -- a massive plan expected to spend some $10.5 billion, known as the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan -- has made little progress since it was launched in 2000.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2mtzijI
via RO Water Filter

The brilliant way weather geeks paid tribute to 'Twister' star Bill Paxton

Hundreds of storm chasers and weather geeks mourned the death of U.S. actor Bill Paxton this weekend. Paxton, who was 61, starred alongside Helen Hunt in Twister, the 1996 film that helped inspire a new generation of storm chasers — those thrill-seekers who track down dangerous weather events for the sake of scientific data, a rush of adrenaline, or both.  SEE ALSO: Bill Paxton, star of '80s and '90s genre films and TV, dead at 61 In the movie, Paxton and Hunt play a struggling couple that teams up to create an advance weather alert system, putting them square in the path of violent tornadoes.  Paxton was so beloved in the weather community that his unexpected death on Saturday sparked a rare tribute tweet from the National Weather Service's official Twitter account.  Twister was an inspiration to many budding meteorologists over the last 20 years. Thank you, Bill Paxton, a.k.a. Bill "The Extreme" Harding. http://pic.twitter.com/OmsB7hkCYF — NWS (@NWS) February 2…

This video game lets you classify real-life planets for science

Gamers and scientists are coming together to explore astronomical data, because science is awesome.  In a collaboration between a multiplayer game EVE…


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lobKMs
via RO Water Filter

'Ring of fire' solar eclipse will blaze across the Southern Hemisphere

A "ring of fire" eclipse will be visible from the Southern Hemisphere on Sunday morning, although anyone can catch the spectacle live via the space site Slooh.com. Sunday's solar phenomenon is known as an annular eclipse. It happens when the moon slides in between the sun and the Earth but doesn't completely block the sun, as would a total solar eclipse.  SEE ALSO: This weekend you can see a lunar eclipse and a comet Instead, a thin, fiery ring of the sun's edges blaze like an iris on an enormous, menacing eye. ring of fire #eclipse live from #Chile WOW :) http://pic.twitter.com/i47LKmXNjl — David Fiacchini (@naturaetratio) February 26, 2017 Skywatchers will catch the best view in Chile and Argentina in South America, as well as Angola, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo in Africa and parts of Antarctica, Space.com reported.  We'll track the #eclipse from start to finish from Chile and South Africa, bringing the full experience to you https://t.co/vu…

A 'Hidden Figure' in his own family

ABC News' Ron Claiborne learns that that a cousin was a groundbreaking figure in aeronautical engineering.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lUKAju
via RO Water Filter

Here's How To Watch Ring Of Fire Eclipse Sunday Morning

The eclipse will be most visible at 8:16 a.m.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2mzKOcE
via RO Water Filter

Stargazers applaud as moon eclipses sun

Stargazers applauded as they were plunged into darkness Sunday when the moon passed in front of the sun in a spectacular "ring of fire" eclipse. Astronomers and enthusiasts in Argentina were among the first to see the so-called annular eclipse as it crossed South America shortly after 1200 GMT, on course for Africa. The eclipse was most visible in a 100-kilometer (62-mile) band across Chile, Argentina, Angola, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lYXKfA
via RO Water Filter

Horror movie ‘Life’ draws upon real-life biology and worst-case space scenarios

A real-life organism provides the inspiration for the alien monster at the center of “Life,” a horror movie that’s set on the International Space Station. But you’d never guess which one. Would you believe … slime mold? “We used that as a model, working with the effects team, but ramped it up enormously,” said Adam Rutherford, who served as a science consultant for the film. Moviegoers can get a glimpse at the results in the online trailers for “Life,” which opens in theaters on March 24. Rutherford didn’t just throw a dart at the tree of life to select slime mold.… Read More


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2ldvYr9
via RO Water Filter

What Can Hidden Figures Teach Us About Workplace Diversity?

Before this movie, I had no idea that so many women had participated in NASA, nor did I know that black women had contributed so significantly to America's advances in the 'space race'. Factually, Hidden Figures identified the three black females who shaped an industry, these women were previously hidden from us, which starts to explain why this was news to a large proportion of the audience viewing it. It's different to the other roles and stories we have gotten used to see black female actresses play, it was a refreshing and inspiring story about three black women who achieved incredible things.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lo4gc9
via RO Water Filter

Video games can and should inspire entire societies to do better

If the medium of video games wants to be considered great art it needs to move beyond simply motivating the individual and strive to move entire societies. "If you want video games to be treated as art, some, not all of you, are going to need to step it up," Dr. Jeff Norris, mission operations innovation lead at JPL NASA, told a gathering of developers in Las Vegas this week. Speaking at this year's DICE Summit, Norris pointed to the seminal work of Chesley Bonestell, a pioneer in the creation of art that blended scientific fact with best informed guesses to deliver stunning images of space.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lJKwR7
via RO Water Filter

This gorgeous video about the Hubble Space Telescope puts our existence into perspective

In 1995, astronomers pointed the Hubble Space Telescope toward a seemingly empty region of space to see what was there. In a short animated video from Vimeo user Bliink, we learn just what the astronomers discovered, and why this seemingly empty region of space is so important to understanding the universe. The video is a gorgeous, minimal affair that outlines the Hubble Deep Image Survey, and puts the scale of that first image into perspective.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2kZUCR3
via RO Water Filter

Everything you need to know about the magical magnetic goop known as ferrofluid

Ferrofluids can do amazing things on YouTube -- gracefully bending into all sorts of structures -- but what exactly are they? Hit the jump to find out how the mysterious liquids work, and how you can get some for yourself.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lTQild
via RO Water Filter

Europeans are cutting down U.S. forests for so-called 'sustainable' energy

European nations, including the UK, are making a grave accounting error that will result in the emissions of more planet-warming greenhouse gases, according to a new report from an independent London think tank.  By counting the burning of wood pellets from felled forests in the U.S., Canada and Russia as a "renewable" or "sustainable" form of energy, nations in the European Union are masking their full impact on the environment, the report warns.  The study, from Chatham House, comes as European officials debate policies that favor particular energy sources, including biomass energy such as wood pellets, as a way to cut planet-warming carbon dioxide. SEE ALSO: Something is very, very wrong with the Arctic climate The report warns that contrary to what many policy makers have been saying, bioenergy involves about as much carbon emissions as coal. In fact, if wood is burned to make steam for electricity, this practice may be 50 percent more carbon intensive than coa…

How sci-fi imagines inhabitable solar systems like TRAPPIST-1

Earlier this week, NASA announced that its scientists had discovered a seven-planet solar system orbiting a star named TRAPPIST-1. For science fiction authors, this is affirmation of a long-standing trope. For decades, authors have imagined solar systems with multiple Earth-like planets that allow for human settlement, providing plenty of space for stories in television and literature.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lIdQHC
via RO Water Filter

We're One Step Closer To Curing The Common Cold

A cure for the common cold could soon become a reality after scientists from the Universities of Leeds, York and Helsinki say they’ve cracked the ‘hidden code’ buried deep within the virus. Banishing the sniffles actually begun in 2015 when scientists at the Universities of Leeds and York identified a series of encrypted signals buried inside a plant virus. What they found was that this signal was identical in all forms of the virus including Human Parechovirus which is a member of the Picornavirus family that includes the common cold.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lmGvBi
via RO Water Filter

Solar-powered cinema opens in Burkina ahead of festival

A solar-powered cinema was unveiled in Burkina Faso Friday ahead of Ouagadougou's hosting of Africa's top film festival, even as movie theatres on the continent continue to disappear. Named Canal Olympia Yennenga, it is now the third-largest movie hall in the Burkina Faso capital Ouagadougou. It is the brainchild of French businessman Vincent Bollore, whose company owns French premium TV and cinema group Canal Plus.


from Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines http://ift.tt/2lFoukp
via RO Water Filter