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Showing posts from February 18, 2017

Zealandia Might Be The World's Smallest Continent, Not Austrailia

According to the Geological Society of America, the landmass is believed to have broken away from Gondwana 60-85 million years ago.


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New tech for women

Tech Take: Andrea Smith showcases the Elektronista Digital Leather Clutch Bag, Thinoptics Glasses and Carrying Case, Simplehuman 8" Sensor Mirror Pro, Clarisonic Mia Fit Cleansing Device and the Suunto Spartan Sport Watch


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How Our Changing Environment Requires a New Definition of Citizenship

It was also the year scientists advised that Earth’s citizens were now living in the Anthropocene, the name proposed for an epoch in which humans influence geology and environment on a global scale. The concept of citizenship originally described inhabitants of (probably walled) towns. Alberto Seveso’s cover illustration for a 2015 edition of Nature dedicated to the Anthropocene highlights some of the key factors that turned humanity into a geophysical force, including nuclear technology, the evolution of agriculture, and the industrial revolution.


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Obama’s top science adviser’s guide to navigating the Trump era

“I’m worried — based on early indications — that we can be in for a major shift in the culture around science and technology and its eminence in government. Trump has yet to select people for several top science jobs in the administration — such as NASA administrator, director of the CDC, and director of the NIH.


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There's a reason why you feel like time is moving slower in Trump's America

Remember the mild, scandal-free days of the Obama years, when the biggest breaking news of the day was the holy war against Frappucino cups or the First Lady escaping the White House to go to CVS?  Yeah. Neither can we. In less than a month, Trump has laid the groundwork for war in fill-in-the-blank, appointed a reality show loser to guard our nuclear weapons, put a white supremacist in charge of national security and made a nationwide call for more "easy D." As our flawed democracy erodes one Trump tweet at a time, our private lives feel static and sleepy in comparison. For some, time feels like its moving slower in Trump's America, and while the earth is spinning at the same speed it always does, psychologists believe that the perception has to do with the way the brain reacts to stress. SEE ALSO: What to do when you're so overwhelmed by the Trump presidency you can barely move Time flies when you're having fun, not living in perpetual fear Take a minute (thoug…

Why Planet Earth II couldn’t avoid stories about humans' devastating impact on the animal kingdom

Madagascar’s indri lemur population has been threatened by rapid deforestation. Anyone who’s ever found themselves captivated by a scene from Planet Earth — the BBC’s landmark 11-part documentary that awed viewers with its stunning presentation of animal life all over the globe — should be looking forward to Planet Earth II. A decade after the original 2006 series wowed audiences with its artfully filmed, high-definition footage of elusive snow leopards and hyrdoplaning dolphins and adorable polar bear cubs, the highly anticipated six-part follow-up promises an even more stunning adventure, albeit one that comes with a grave warning. In this sequel, David Attenborough’s iconic narration often takes a melancholy turn as he explains why an island’s crab population is deteriorating, or why a family of lanky lemurs has lost much of its habitat.


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SpaceX's historic rocket launch Saturday could end in another dramatic landing

On Saturday, SpaceX is expected to make history by launching its first Falcon 9 rocket from historic launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  The pad was originally used during NASA's Apollo era in the 1960s but was revamped to serve the space shuttle in the 1970s.  SEE ALSO: SpaceX did something amazing over the weekend "Some of humanity's greatest adventures in orbit began at Launch Complex 39A," NASA said in a statement. "Astronauts lifted off from this pad six times between 1969 and 1972 to walk upon lunar soil." On Saturday, 39A will feel the flames of a rocket that represents a new generation of American spaceflight — one marked by private ambition and public partnerships —  for the first time.  A Falcon 9 rocket landing on a drone ship in the Pacific Ocean in January 2017. Image: spacex If all goes according to plan, the Falcon 9 will launch an uncrewed Dragon cargo ship loaded down with astronaut supplies and experiments o…

Elon Musk Says SpaceX Investigates Rocket Leak Ahead of Saturday Launch

"If ok, will launch tomorrow"


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NASA’s Juno spacecraft will stay in its long orbit for the remainder of its mission

On Friday, NASA announced that it Juno spacecraft would remain in its current 53-day orbit of Jupiter for the duration of its mission. The decision is a new setback for the spacecraft, which was scheduled to shift to a shorter, 14 day orbital schedule. This isn’s the first time that Juno has run into issues orbiting Jupiter.


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Finding poison in N. Korean airport attack is hardest part

A paranoid dictator's estranged brother. Two young female assassins. A crowded international airport. And a mysterious poison that kills within hours. It's the perfect recipe for a thrilling cloak-and-dagger ...


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Nasa resurrects ancient life forms found in Mexico's Naica mines

A group of 50,000 year-old microbes found in a cave in Mexico are being used to support arguments that alien organisms could find homes in extreme environments on other planets. The organisms, found in a cave in Naica, in Mexico, have been revived by Nasa in an attempt to demonstrate how other life forms can still flourish in hostile environments. Encased in gypsum shafts, the microbes have lived inside the soft sulphate mineral for the last 10,000 years.


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Can Woolly Mammoths Be Brought Back To Life?

A team of scientists from Harvard is attempting to create a “mammophant” — essentially an elephant with mammoth-like features.


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Study: Big data helps struggling college students graduate

WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting through college isn't easy, and it can be even harder for low-income and first generation students with few support resources. A new tool involving big data can help those at risk.


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Zealandia Might Be The World's Smallest Continent, Not Austrailia

According to the Geological Society of America, the landmass is believed to have broken away from Gondwana 60-85 million years ago.


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Elon Musk is a SpaceX truther

What are you trying to hide SpaceX? Over the past two years, SpaceX has been working to make its rockets reusable by landing the vehicles upright after they launch to space. Some simply argue that landing videos are clips of rockets taking off played in reverse.


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50,000-Year-Old Life-Forms Discovered In Mexico

The microbes, previously unknown to science, were lying dormant among giant crystals in the famous Naica mountain caves.


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NASA's Next Frontier Is Washington

Only one president’s name came up during the new Congress’s first hearing about NASA this week: John F. Kennedy. This makes sense. The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology gathered on Thursday to discuss the “past, present, and future” of NASA, as the name of the hearing suggested, and no president was more instrumental in shaping that past than Kennedy. There was no surprise when one congressman from Colorado reminded the panelists at the hearing that Kennedy chose “to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”


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More Than 200 Baldness-Linked Genetic Markers Found

More than 200 new genetic markers linked with male pattern baldness have been identified, according to a new study from the United Kingdom. The researchers in the new study were also able to use their set of genetic markers to predict men's chances of severe hair loss, although the scientists noted that their results apply more to large populations of people than to any given individual. "We are still a long way from making an accurate prediction for an individual's hair-loss pattern.


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Neil deGrasse Tyson talks science and Snowden at RSA

Speaking at the annual cybersecurity conference, Tyson calls Edward Snowden patriotic and held forth on the importance of science


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Elon Musk says robots will make 'basic income' necessary

Tesla boss says artificial intelligence will take everyone's jobs, forcing the government to step in


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New supercomputer aids climate research in top coal state

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — A new supercomputer in the top coal-mining state has begun critical climate-change research with support from even some global warming doubters, but scientists worry President Donald Trump could cut funding for such programs.


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Lost Essay Suggests Winston Churchill Believed In Aliens

He also predicted space travel


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CDC says reviewing air hoses used in biosafety labs

(Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday it is reviewing the use of air hoses attached to protective suits worn in its Biosafety Level-4 labs. The CDC said it has suspended laboratory work that involves the use of these air hoses, which have been in use since 2005, during the review period.


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Firepower: Could bionic eyes give the military super sight?

Tech Take: Allison Barrie with an inside look at a few of the many exciting projects underway to both restore and provide enhanced sight


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Facial recognition software for lemurs could help save endangered species

A team biologists and computer scientists have created the first ever facial recognition system for lemurs, able to identify more than 100 different individuals with 98.7 percent accuracy. “Like humans, lemurs have unique facial characteristics that can be recognized by this system," biometrics expert Anil Jain, who worked on the software, told Phys.org. The system is adapted from facial recognition software for humans.


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SpaceX is pushing back the target launch date for its first Mars mission

Last year, SpaceX announced a bold plan to launch its Dragon spacecraft to Mars as soon as 2018 — in what would be the first ever private mission to the Red Planet. SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell confirmed today that SpaceX is now targeting the year 2020 for the Mars trip, a move that will allow the company to better focus on its other ambitious projects.


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Winston Churchill Asked ‘Are We Alone in the Universe?’ He Also Wrote on Biology, Evolution

Shortly before Nazi Germany invaded Poland and launched World War II, Winston Churchill wrote an essay that asked “Are We Alone in the Universe?” For the next several years, as he led the United Kingdom through the war, it’s unlikely he had much time to continue musing about the possibility of extraterrestrial life. Mario Livio, an astrophysicist and best-selling author, wrote about the recently unearthed “Are We Alone in the Universe?” in a piece published Wednesday in the science journal Nature. Some of the original typewritten pages of Churchill’s essay went up on display at the National Churchill Museum on Thursday afternoon.


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Sorry, y'all. SpaceX isn't going to Mars in 2018

In April 2016, SpaceX made the bold proclamation that it will send a robotic mission to Mars by 2018.  Today, the Elon Musk-founded company is singing a different tune.  Instead of aiming for the 2018 deadline, SpaceX will now try to launch a robotic mission to Mars — known as its Red Dragon mission — two years later, in 2020, SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said during a press conference Friday.  SEE ALSO: SpaceX's historic rocket launch Saturday could end in another dramatic landing This delay will allow the company to refocus on other more, earthly ambitions in the near term before setting its sights on Mars down the road. "We were focused on 2018, but we felt like we needed to put more resources and focus more heavily on our crew program and our Falcon Heavy program, so we’re looking more in the 2020 time frame for that," Shotwell said.  Artist's illustration of a Mars landing. Image: spacex The 2020 mission should involve sending a Dragon spacecraft to Mars usi…

Antarctica just shed a Manhattan-sized iceberg, and a bigger one is coming soon

An iceberg the size of Manhattan has cleaved off of Antarctica's rapidly melting Pine Island Glacier on the southwest coast of the continent. NASA released the new data showing the iceberg's birth on Feb. 15, though the imagery was acquired between Jan. 26 and Jan. 31.  The agency says "about a kilometer or two of ice" broke off the glacier's floating ice shelf during this period, making it a large iceberg but comparitively small in the recent history of this particular area.  SEE ALSO: This 'GOT' star teamed up with Google to capture Greenland's melting ice According to Ian Howat, a glaciologist at Ohio State University, the event was about 10 times smaller than the chunk of ice that broke off the same glacier in July 2015, when a 20-mile, or 30-kilometer, rift developed and calved an iceberg spanning 225 square miles. “I think this event is the calving equivalent of an ‘aftershock’ following the much bigger event,” Howat said in a press release.  “A…

Why Exercise Is Not Enough to Prevent Weight Gain

Exercise on its own — without also following a healthy diet — isn't enough to help people lose or even just maintain their weight, a recent study suggests. The new results run counter to the idea that the obesity epidemic in the U.S. is caused by a lack of physical activity, said lead study author Lara Dugas, an assistant professor of public health sciences at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. When it comes to figuring out the causes of obesity, "what we really need to look at is what people are eating," Dugas told Live Science.


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Rare Leptospirosis Cases in NYC: 5 Things to Know

Three people in New York City recently became sick with a rare bacterial disease called leptospirosis that they might have contracted from rats, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). All three cases occurred in a one-block section of a neighborhood in the Bronx called the  Concourse over the past two months, the DOHMH said in a statement. Although New York City typically sees about one to three cases of leptospirosis per year, this is the first time that health officials have identified a cluster of leptospirosis cases (meaning more than a single case occurring in the same place around the same time) in the city, the DOHMH said.


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New mosquito trap smart enough to keep just the bad bugs

WASHINGTON (AP) — A smart trap for mosquitoes? A new high-tech version is promising to catch the bloodsuckers while letting friendlier insects escape — and even record the exact weather conditions when different species emerge to bite.


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Justin Ross Harris goes to trial for son's hot car death: Part 4

At trial, it is publicly revealed that Harris had been having affairs and exchanging text messages with other women.


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Historic Cape Canaveral launchpad returns to action with SpaceX

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - The seaside Florida launchpad from which astronauts once blasted off for the moon comes back to life this weekend thanks to the commercial space venture founded by tech entrepreneur Elon Musk. Space Exploration Technologies Corp is preparing for liftoff at 10:01 a.m. EST (1501 GMT) on Saturday from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, which was the starting point for 82 space shuttle missions. The launchpad, originally built for the 1960s-era Apollo moon program, has not been used since the final space shuttle blasted off in July 2011.


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Biologists find weird cave life that may be 50,000 years old

BOSTON (AP) — In a Mexican cave system so beautiful and hot that it is called both Fairyland and hell, scientists have discovered life trapped in crystals that could be 50,000 years old.


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Advances in imaging could deepen knowledge of brain

New imaging techniques enable exploration of the brain in much more detail than ever before, opening the door to greater understanding of neurological problems and possibly new treatments, researchers say. Showcased this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, the research and innovations are the product of three US scientists involved in a project launched by former president Barack Obama in 2013 to unlock the inner workings of the brain. Obama's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative promised a multidisciplinary approach, with a budget of $434 million for 2017, aimed at unlocking the mysteries of the brain and treating diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and schizophrenia.


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SpaceX and Boeing probably won’t be flying astronauts to the station until 2019, report suggests

Since its inception, NASA’s Commercial Crew Program has been hampered by setback after setback, and it looks like even more delays are on the horizon for the fledgling initiative. The program — which tasks US private companies with building spacecraft that can transport NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station — was originally supposed to get off the ground in 2017.


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Elon Musk Says SpaceX Investigates Rocket Leak Ahead of Saturday Launch

"If ok, will launch tomorrow"


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Hybrid woolly mammoths could soon walk the Earth, thanks to Harvard scientists

Miss the woolly mammoth? Soon you won't have to, because Harvard scientists are working to develop a "hybrid elephant-mammoth embryo," which could be grown within the next couple of years.


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Technical issue forces SpaceX to put its first liftoff from historic Pad 39A on hold

SpaceX postponed the first launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center since the last shuttle flight in 2011, due to concerns about a control system on the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage. The Falcon 9 had been due to loft a robotic Dragon cargo capsule into orbit from the center’s Launch Pad 39A in Florida, delivering 5,500 pounds worth of supplies and experiments for the International Space Station. But with less than 20 seconds left in today’s countdown, SpaceX’s mission managers decided they needed more time to work through a nagging technical issue with the controls for the second stage’s rocket engine nozzle.… Read More


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A man with a nasty habit of suing the EPA now leads it, because why not?

Congrats, America: We now have a Senate-confirmed administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) again.  Oh, except that administrator is Scott Pruitt, the former Oklahoma attorney general who sued the EPA multiple times over what he sees as its overly aggressive environmental regulations. Plus, he denies the mainstream scientific conclusion that human emissions of greenhouse gases are the primary cause of global warming.  So, there are those little caveats. SEE ALSO: Exxon's former CEO is now our secretary of state. So, there's that. Pruitt has also questioned the dangers of mercury contamination and other hazardous substances the EPA is in charge of regulating. His record is so one-sided that the Sierra Club calls him simply, "... The most dangerous EPA Administrator in the history of our country." Pruitt's reputation as an agency foe eager to give states more autonomy in regulating air and water pollution, combined with the EPA transition team'…

NASA’s Juno To Stay In 53-Day Jupiter Orbit

The space agency dropped its plan to fire the spacecraft’s main engine, a risky maneuver that would have reduced the orbital period to 14 days for its fifth flyby of Jupiter.


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Zealandia: All you need to know about the long lost continent

Zealandia has recently been given the status of a continent by several geologists who say that the long lost continent is submerged under water. IBTimes UK tells you all you need to know about the long lost continent. It is located on the southwest Pacific Ocean mostly surrounding, in what is the current land mass of New Zealand and its adjoining islands.


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NASA’s Juno spacecraft will stay in its long orbit for the remainder of its mission

On Friday, NASA announced that it Juno spacecraft would remain in its current 53-day orbit of Jupiter for the duration of its mission. The decision is a new setback for the spacecraft, which was scheduled to shift to a shorter, 14 day orbital schedule. This isn’s the first time that Juno has run into issues orbiting Jupiter.


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