Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February 14, 2017

Giants' Mark Melancon: a closer who's open to sports science

Mark Melancon sprints to the mound and his heart starts racing — at precisely 183 beats per minute. It's all by careful design for San Francisco's new closer. "I didn't realize it was that high," ...


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lNmP9l
via RO Water Filter

Fossil shows pregnant momma sea monster with developing embryo

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An extraordinary fossil unearthed in southwestern China shows a pregnant long-necked marine reptile that lived millions of years before the dinosaurs with its developing embryo, indicating this creature gave birth to live babies rather than laying eggs. Scientists on Tuesday said the fossil of the unusual fish-eating reptile called Dinocephalosaurus, which lived about 245 million years ago during the Triassic Period, changes the understanding of the evolution of vertebrate reproductive systems. Dinocephalosaurus is the first member of a broad vertebrate group called archosauromorphs that includes birds, crocodilians, dinosaurs and extinct flying reptiles known as pterosaurs known to give birth this way, paleontologist Jun Liu of China's Hefei University of Technology said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lHCEme
via RO Water Filter

Climate Threat to Wildlife May Have Been Massively Underreported

More than 700 of the world's threatened and endangered animal species may be directly affected by climate change, according to a new study — vastly more than the number of animal species scientists initially thought would face risks from global warming. Scientists had previously determined that only 7 percent of mammals and 4 percent of birds on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) "Red List" of threatened species are affected by climate change. In a comprehensive analysis of 130 previous studies on the subject, researchers found that nearly half of the world's threatened and endangered mammals and nearly a quarter of birds are already seriously impacted — more than 700 species total.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2ktRmbv
via RO Water Filter

Scientists soften on DNA editing of human eggs, sperm, embryos: report

By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Although not ready yet, powerful gene editing tools may one day be used on human embryos, eggs and sperm to remove genes that cause inherited diseases, according to a report by U.S. scientists and ethicists released on Tuesday. The report from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine said scientific advances make gene editing in human reproductive cells "a realistic possibility that deserves serious consideration.” The statement signals a softening in approach over the use of the technology known as CRISPR-Cas9, which has opened up new frontiers in genetic medicine because of its ability to modify genes quickly and efficiently. In December 2015, scientists and ethicists at an international meeting held at the NAS in Washington said it would be "irresponsible" to use gene editing technology in human embryos for therapeutic purposes, such as to correct genetic diseases, until safety and efficacy i…

Scientists soften on DNA editing of human eggs, sperm, embryos - report

By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Although not ready yet, powerful gene editing tools may one day be used on human embryos, eggs and sperm to remove genes that cause inherited diseases, according to a report by U.S. scientists and ethicists released on Tuesday. The report from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine said scientific advances make gene editing in human reproductive cells "a realistic possibility that deserves serious consideration.” The statement signals a softening in approach over the use of the technology known as CRISPR-Cas9, which has opened up new frontiers in genetic medicine because of its ability to modify genes quickly and efficiently. In December 2015, scientists and ethicists at an international meeting held at the NAS in Washington said it would be "irresponsible" to use gene editing technology in human embryos for therapeutic purposes, such as to correct genetic diseases, until safety and efficacy i…