Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February 6, 2017

Exclusive: SpaceX to hit fastest launch pace with new Florida site - executive

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Space Exploration Technologies Corp, better known as SpaceX, plans to launch its Falcon 9 rockets every two to three weeks, its fastest rate since starting launches in 2010, once a new launch pad is put into service in Florida next week, the company's president told Reuters on Monday. The ambitious plan comes only five months after a SpaceX rocket burst into flames on the launch pad at the company's original launch site in Florida. SpaceX, controlled by billionaire Elon Musk, has only launched one rocket since then, in mid-January.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lhL9jA
via RO Water Filter

Stewards of Federal Lands Feel Threatened, Survey Shows

Many of the people who take care of U.S. federal lands and wildlife refuges say their jobs have become more dangerous, according to a new survey. Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), a nonprofit that represents government staff, released the results of the survey on Feb. 2. The group gathered responses from 104 out of 302 managers of the Fish and Wildlife Service's federal refuge and 364 employees of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), including scientists, archaeologists and public lands managers.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2kkaZpz
via RO Water Filter

Super Bowl 2017: Is a Turf or Grass Field Riskier for Players?

Does the field's surface type — grass or turf — affect players' injury rates? One of the benefits of artificial turf is that the surface is more uniform — free of things like potholes, said Brian Dorfman, a kinesiologist who owns an injury rehabilitation practice in California and works with both professional and Olympic athletes. "Generally, the issues with grass surfaces are that they are not a perfect surface," Dorfman told Live Science.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lgMKqz
via RO Water Filter

How Do Tom Brady's Pricy Pajamas Work?

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady could be resting up for the big game in some special sleepwear: He wears "bioceramic pajamas," which are claimed to have health benefits such as reduced inflammation. Brady called the pajamas "game-changing" in a statement sent to Live Science from Under Armour. Certain materials, such as ceramics, can give off far-infrared radiation, said Rick Sachleben, a member of the American Chemical Society.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lbT6uF
via RO Water Filter

Why Young Kids Should Spend Equal Time with Divorced Parents

When parents separate or divorce, they often wonder what's best for their young children: should they spend more time with their mother in order to maintain a strong relationship? Previous research suggested that when a child spends too much time with his or her father early in life, it can damage the mother-child bond, which had been viewed as the more important relationship, the researchers wrote in the study. However, the researchers found that "not only did overnight parenting time with fathers during infancy and toddlerhood cause no harm to the mother-child relationship, it actually appeared to benefit children's relationships with both their mothers and their fathers," lead study author William Fabricius, an associate professor of psychology at Arizona State University, said in a statement.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2kjsc2c
via RO Water Filter

Marijuana Compound Shows Some Potential for Treating Opioid Addiction

A component of marijuana may help heroin users resist the urge to use the drug and alleviate withdrawal symptoms, but more research should be done in this area, according to a new review of previous research. So far, research on these marijuana compounds, called cannabinoids, for treating opioid addiction has been scarce because of certain regulations that restrict their testing in humans, according to the review. This dearth of research in the field is particularly important considering the ongoing epidemic of opioid abuse in the United States, according to the review author.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lfRSdF
via RO Water Filter

Cheerleaders of the Deep: How Pom-Pom Crabs Got Their Name

The mystery of a bizarre crab that is always found clutching two sea anemones in its claws may have been solved: The crabs clone their poufy accessories, new research suggests. Lybia leptochelis, also known as a boxer crab or a pom-pom crab, will fight over the sea anemones and then split the remaining ones in two. The split sea anemones will regenerate over the course of a few days.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2kjocib
via RO Water Filter

'Mud Monsters' Galore! Mariana Trench Dive Yields Bizarre Deep-Sea Life

A recent underwater expedition to the Mariana Trench, the deepest known ocean spot in the world, filmed many forms of bizarre marine life close to the seafloor, and captured the first-ever footage of a shrimp feeding at record-breaking depths. Sponges on stalks, ghost-pale lizard fish and a hermit crab carrying an anemone hitchhiker were among the so-called "mud monsters" that paraded in front of the cameras of the remotely operated vehicle (ROV), offering a rare glimpse of deep-sea animals' habits and lifestyles that are normally extremely challenging to observe and study. This is the deepest ocean observation of this group of shrimp to date, the scientists wrote in a new study.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2kjp06V
via RO Water Filter

160-Million-Year-Old Pterosaur Ate Like a Flamingo

During the dinosaur era, pterosaurs would swoop down and snap up wriggly fish and buzzing insects with their spiky teeth, with the exception of one odd group — pterosaurs that ate their meals like modern-day flamingos do: by filter feeding. Now, researchers have found the earliest filter-feeding pterosaur on record. The specimen, which was discovered in northeast China's Liaoning province, is 160 million years old, and dates to the Jurassic period (199.6 million to 145.5 million years ago), according to a new study.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lbQBIV
via RO Water Filter

Physicists 'See' Location of 23,000 Single Atoms for First Time

For the first time, scientists have seen the exact locations of more than 23,000 atoms in a particle that's small enough to fit inside the wall of a single cell. A team led by Peter Ercius of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Jianwei Miao of UCLA used a scanning electron microscope to examine a particle that was made of iron (Fe) and platinum (Pt) that was only 8.4 nanometers across, they reported yesterday (Feb. 1) in the journal Nature. "At the nanoscale, every atom counts," Michael Farle, a physicist at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany, wrote in an accompanying News and Views article in Nature.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lgEarO
via RO Water Filter

Sleeping Shrinks the Brain … and That's a Good Thing

Ah, to sleep, perchance … to shrink your neural connections? The researchers found that sleep provides a time when the brain's synapses — the connections among neurons — shrink back by nearly 20 percent. During this time, the synapses rest and prepare for the next day, when they will grow stronger while receiving new input — that is, learning new things, the researchers said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2lbFHTi
via RO Water Filter

Scientists find crop-destroying caterpillar spreading rapidly in Africa

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists tracking a crop-destroying caterpillar known as armyworm say it is now spreading rapidly across mainland Africa and could reach tropical Asia and the Mediterranean in the next few years, threatening agricultural trade. In research released on Monday, scientists at the Britain-based Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) said the pest, which had not previously been established outside the Americas, is now expected to spread "to the limits of suitable African habitat" within a few years.  The caterpillar destroys young maize plants, attacking their growing points and burrowing into the cobs. "It likely travelled to Africa as adults or egg masses on direct commercial flights and has since been spread within Africa by its own strong flight ability and carried as a contaminant on crop produce," said CABI's chief scientist Matthew Cock.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2kcB9rQ
vi…