Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from January 11, 2017

Scientists: Moon over the hill at 4.51 billion years old

It turns out the moon is older than many scientists suspected: a ripe 4.51 billion years old. That's the newest estimate, thanks to rocks and soil collected by the Apollo 14 moonwalkers in 1971. A research ...


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2jEFG9G
via RO Water Filter

How Old Is the Moon? Scientists Say They Finally Know

The moon is a very old soul, it turns out. A new analysis of lunar rocks brought to Earth by Apollo astronauts suggests that the moon formed 4.51 billion years ago — just 60 million years after the solar system itself took shape. Some previous studies have come up with similar estimates, while others have argued for a younger moon that coalesced 150 million to 200 million years after the solar system was born.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2jEGXO5
via RO Water Filter

Pile of Skeletons Found Inside 2,400-Year-Old Tomb in Iraq

A 2,400-year-old tomb filled with the skeletons of at least six people has been discovered in northern Iraq. The tomb was constructed toward the end, or just after, the time of the Achaemenid Empire (550 to 330 B.C.), an empire in the Middle East that was conquered by Alexander the Great in a series of campaigns, according to the archaeologists, led by Michael Danti, a professor at Boston University. The excavation results were presented by Kyra Kaercher and Katie Downey, graduate students at the University of Pennsylvania and The Ohio State University, respectively, in November 2016 at the American Schools of Oriental Research's annual meeting.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2iGImQ2
via RO Water Filter

Antarctic Science Lab On the Move to Escape Breaking Ice

A British scientific base in Antarctica is on the move to a new location, to avoid being cut adrift by a crack in a floating ice shelf. The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) announced on New Year's Eve that the first module of the Halley VI Research Station was towed by tractors to a new site on the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica's Weddell Sea, 14 miles (23 kilometers) east of its former location. The remaining seven main buildings of the modular research base will be towed to the new site over the coming weeks, as the relocation team takes advantage of the 24 hours of daylight during the brief Antarctic summer.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2j7MXyg
via RO Water Filter

Ancient Toy Inspires Low-Cost Medical Diagnostic Tool

Modern medicine relies heavily on technology, like centrifuges, that are costly, bulky and require electricity. The centrifuge is the workhorse of modern medical laboratories. Most diagnostics "are like looking for a needle in a haystack," said Manu Prakash, lead researcher on the new study and an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford University.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2jvv1tY
via RO Water Filter

Ranking Romance: Here Are the Best (and Worst) States for Love

If you're living in Virginia, you may be in the wrong state. In a study of positive relationships in all 50 U.S. states, researchers found that Virginia ― despite its slogan ― is not "for lovers." That travel slogan should belong to Mississippi, Utah or Wisconsin, which topped the rankings. Lead author William Chopik, an assistant psychology professor at Michigan State University, said the study results fit many state's stereotypes.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2iFUUaq
via RO Water Filter

Dramatic Man-of-War Takes Top Ocean Art Photography Prize

A dramatic Pacific man-of-war framed against a deep black sea is the subject of one of the winning photos in this year's Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition. This year is the contest's sixth, and the top "Best in Show" prize went to a photo called "Blue Lasso" by Matty Smith. The photo, which also won the top prize in the wide-angle category, was shot in Bushrangers Bay in New South Wales, Australia.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2jvhlzb
via RO Water Filter

Seahawks Score Touchdown, and Fans Shake Earthquake Monitors

Seattle Seahawks fans' enthusiastic stomping and cheering at CenturyLink Field during the NFL playoff season is so powerful it can be felt by sensitive earthquake-detection equipment. The Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) installed an array of seismometers (equipment that visualizes shaking as waves) at several stations throughout the stadium, in anticipation of the tremors that Seahawks followers have become famous for generating. Preliminary analysis of the Jan. 7 data revealed that the largest recorded seismic signal emerged shortly after 8 p.m. local time during a play toward the end of the game, when Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson threw a touchdown pass to wide receiver Doug Baldwin.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2jvcfD5
via RO Water Filter