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Showing posts from December 22, 2016

Bite the dust: meek dinosaur lost its teeth as it hit adulthood

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A modest little dinosaur that scampered across northwestern China 160 million years ago boasted a unique trait not seen in any other dinosaur or other prehistoric creature yet unearthed: it was born with teeth but became toothless by adulthood. Scientists on Thursday said fossils of 19 individuals of a dinosaur called Limusaurus, ranging in age from under a year to 10 years, showed that juveniles had small, sharp teeth but adults developed a toothless beak. This cluster of dinosaurs, found in Xinjiang Province, apparently became hopelessly trapped in a mud pit and died.


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Swat team: scientists track humongous number of flying bugs

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Counting the number of bugs whizzing high overhead annually may seem all but impossible, but researchers in Britain have completed the most comprehensive tally ever conducted. "High-altitude aerial migration of insects is enormous," said University of Exeter entomologist Jason Chapman, whose research was published in the journal Science. In terms of biomass, the insects greatly exceeded migratory birds in Britain.


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Swat team - scientists track humongous number of flying bugs

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Counting the number of bugs whizzing high overhead annually may seem all but impossible, but researchers in Britain have completed the most comprehensive tally ever conducted. "High-altitude aerial migration of insects is enormous," said University of Exeter entomologist Jason Chapman, whose research was published in the journal Science. In terms of biomass, the insects greatly exceeded migratory birds in Britain.

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Gravitational-Wave Hunters Surf to Top Science Magazine Award

One of the world's top scientific magazines has awarded its highest yearly honor to an experiment searching for ripples in the fabric of the universe. Science magazine bestowed its 2016 Breakthrough of the Year Award upon the collaboration of scientists who built and operate the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), the journal announced today (Dec. 22). Gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein in 1915, but it took a century to procure the first-ever direct detection of this cosmic phenomena.


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Happy Birthday, Colo! World's Oldest Gorilla Celebrates 60th

The first gorilla born in human care turned 60 today (Dec. 22) at her home in the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Ohio. Colo, whose name is a combination of "Columbus" and "Ohio," is a western lowland gorilla, and is the oldest gorilla in the world. Now entering her seventh decade, Colo's birth and subsequent reproductive success represent years of progress in the care and breeding of captive gorillas, the Columbus Zoo said in a statement.


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Pot-Shop Employees May Recommend Wrong Strain of Marijuana

Many staff members at marijuana dispensaries have not had any formal training for their positions, according to a small new study. Researchers found that 30 people of the 55 dispensary staff members surveyed in the study (55 percent) had received any sort of formal training for their current positions. Only 20 percent had received any medical training on the health effects of marijuana, and just 13 percent had received any training on the science of the drug, the researchers found.


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Deaths from Fentanyl Overdoses Double in a Single Year

The report, from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration, used a new method to examine drug overdose deaths in the United States. Traditionally, government researchers have used specific codes that are placed on death certificates to analyze causes of death in the population. So in the new report, the researchers developed a way to analyze the actual text on death certificates, including notes written by the medical examiner or coroner.


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