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Showing posts from December 20, 2016

Mouthwash May Kill Gonorrhea Bacteria

The bacteria that cause gonorrhea can be found in a person's throat, but stopping the growth of these germs may be as simple as gargling with mouthwash, a small new study from Australia finds. The idea that mouthwash could kill certain strains of bacteria is not new — in fact, as far back as 1879, Listerine advertised that it could "cure" gonorrhea, according to the new study. The rates of gonorrhea, which is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have more than doubled in men in Australia over the past five years, the researchers, led Eric Chow, a research fellow at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in Australia, wrote in the study.


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El Nino-linked cyclones to increase in Pacific with global warming: research

By Umberto Bacchi LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Small Pacific island states could be hit by more tropical cyclones during future El Nino weather patterns due to climate change, scientists said on Tuesday. El Nino is a warming of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific occurring every two to seven years which can trigger both floods and drought in different parts of the world. Its opposite phase, a cooling of the same waters known as La Nina, is associated with the increased probability of wetter conditions over much of Australia and increased numbers of tropical cyclones.

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El Nino-linked cyclones to increase in Pacific with global warming - research

By Umberto Bacchi LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Small Pacific island states could be hit by more tropical cyclones during future El Nino weather patterns due to climate change, scientists said on Tuesday. El Nino is a warming of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific occurring every two to seven years which can trigger both floods and drought in different parts of the world. Its opposite phase, a cooling of the same waters known as La Nina, is associated with the increased probability of wetter conditions over much of Australia and increased numbers of tropical cyclones.

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El Nino-linked cyclones to increase in Pacific with global warming - research

By Umberto Bacchi LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Small Pacific island states could be hit by more tropical cyclones during future El Nino weather patterns due to climate change, scientists said on Tuesday. El Nino is a warming of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific occurring every two to seven years which can trigger both floods and drought in different parts of the world. Its opposite phase, a cooling of the same waters known as La Nina, is associated with the increased probability of wetter conditions over much of Australia and increased numbers of tropical cyclones.


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A Cosmic Wikipedia: Massive Digital Sky Survey Is Unveiled for Scientists

The Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System, or Pan-STARRS, began observing the night sky in 2010, using a 1.8-meter telescope at the summit of Haleakala, on the island of Maui in Hawaii. The newly released catalog is the world's largest digital sky survey to date, according to a statement from the University of Hawaii Institute of Astronomy, the project's headquarters. In addition to making the data freely available, the project collaborators have spent years making the catalog easy for other scientists to use.


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Real Science Inspires Voyage to the Stars in 'Passengers'

The new space flick "Passengers" takes place in a far-off, science-fiction future, but modern-day science is laying the groundwork to turn some of those fictional elements into reality. At a panel discussion Sony Pictures held earlier this month, two real-world scientists talked about two key scientific elements that were portrayed in the film: the search for Earth-like planets around other stars, and placing humans into temporary stasis (a state that's like hibernation) for trips through space. The scientists were joined by "Passengers" screenwriter John Spaights, who talked about some of the real science that inspired the movie.


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Dozens Dead in Siberia from Drinking Bath Oil: How Methanol Kills

Authorities in Irkutsk, the sixth-largest city in Russia, declared a state of emergency today (Dec. 19) after at least 49 people died from drinking the apparently mislabeled bath oil, according to the Washington Post. The label on the bath oil said it contained ethanol, and people drank the product as a cheap alternative to alcohol, which is a common practice in Russia, the Post reported. When people consume methanol, the body metabolizes it first into formaldehyde, and then into a compound called formic acid, which is highly toxic to cells, according to the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology.


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Patients Treated by Female Docs Have Lower Risk of Death

More research is needed to understand why exactly patients treated by female doctors have lower mortality rate, study co-author Dr. Ashish Jha, a professor of health policy at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said in a statement. But previous research has suggested that there are differences between how male and female physicians practice medicine, Jha said.


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Marijuana Use on the Rise Among Pregnant Women

Marijuana use among pregnant women in the U.S. increased by 62 percent from 2002 to 2014, a new study finds. Researchers found that 3.9 percent of pregnant women reported on a 2014 government survey that they had used marijuana during the past month, up from 2.4 percent who said the same on a 2002 survey, according to the study. Although this 3.9 percent rate "is not high, the increases over time and potential adverse consequences of prenatal marijuana exposure suggest further monitoring and research are warranted," the researchers, led by Qiana Brown, an epidemiologist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City, wrote in their report.


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Japan successfully launches solid fuel rocket

Japan's space agency said on Tuesday it had successfully launched a solid fuel rocket named Epsilon-2, the latest in Tokyo's effort to stay competitive in an industry that has robust growth potential and strong security implications. The 26-meter-long rocket, launched at about 8 p.m. (1100 GMT) from the Uchinoura Space Center in southern Japan, released a satellite for studying radiation belts around the earth soon after the lift-off, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) said. The Epsilon-2 three-stage rocket is part of a new generation of solid propellant rockets and makes it possible for launch costs to be reduced up to one third, according to JAXA.


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