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Showing posts from November 14, 2016

3,000-Year-Old Mummy Found in Egyptian Tomb

Spanish archaeologists have unearthed an ancient Egyptian mummy in "very good condition" near Luxor, Egypt's antiquities ministry has announced. "The tomb was uncovered at the southern enclosure wall of the Temple of Millions of Years," Mahmoud Afifi, head of the ancient Egyptian antiquities department of the ministry, said in a statement. The temple was built on the west bank of the Nile near Luxor by Pharaoh Thutmosis III (1490-1436 BC), one of Egypt's greatest warrior kings.


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'Supermoon' Science: NASA Explains the Closest Full Moon Until 2034

The November "supermoon" is extra close to Earth today  (Nov. 14), providing an extraordinary sight for skywatchers — but exactly what makes this month's full moon so special? November's supermoon —a term used to describe a full moon is at its perigee, or closest point to Earth during the lunar orbit — will be the biggest and brightest supermoon to rise in almost 69 years. In fact, the full moon won't come this close to Earth again until Nov. 25, 2034.


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Supermoon delights world's star gazers in full moon, eclipse combination

By Patrick Johnston SYDNEY (Reuters) - From Beijing to Berlin, star gazers around the world admired the supermoon - the largest, brightest full moon in nearly seven decades - as it made its way across the skies on Sunday and Monday. In Australia, some sky-watchers climbed to the top of the Sydney Harbour Bridge to get a closer view of the moon as it ducked between the clouds over the city. The supermoon, also known as a blood moon, was produced when the shadow of Earth cast a reddish glow on the moon, the result of a rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year.


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Saber-Toothed Cat Had a Huge Skull, But a Puny Bite

A newly described fossil skull from one of the largest of the saber-toothed cats, Machairodus horribilis, is the biggest saber-toothed skull ever found, and is helping scientists understand the diversity of killing techniques used by these extinct and fearsome predators. The skull was excavated from the Longjiagou Basin in Gansu Province, China, but languished in storage for decades before researchers rediscovered it in a collection room and identified it in the new study. And while M. horribilis may have had the biggest skull of the saber-toothed cats, it didn't necessarily have the biggest bite.


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Fit for a King? Medieval Book 'Illuminates' Likely Theft by Henry VIII

A lavishly illustrated medieval book, full of gold leaf and finely painted images, the "Aberdeen Bestiary" had remained somewhat of a mystery. "The book was used for teaching — many words have accents on them to indicate emphasis for reading out loud," lead researcher Jane Geddes, an art historian from the University of Aberdeen, told Live Science. The book, which is considered an "illuminated" manuscript for its highly decorated pages, particularly those that gleam, or light up, with gold leaf, tells stories about animals as a way to illustrate moral beliefs, according to the University of Aberdeen.


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Marijuana Use May Weaken Your Heart Muscle

Marijuana use may be linked to a weakened heart muscle, a new studyfinds. Researchers found that people who used marijuana were twice as likely to later develop a heart condition called transient ventricular regional ballooning (TVRB) than those who did not use marijuana. TVRB is a form of cardiomyopathy, which is a sudden weakening of the heart muscle that can mimic symptoms of a heart attack.


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Boys' and Girls' Brains May Show Opposite Effects After a Trauma

Traumatic events may affect the brains of boys and girls differently, a new study finds. Among boys in the study, a brain area called the anterior circular sulcus was larger among those who had symptoms of a trauma, compared with a control group of boys who did not have any trauma symptoms. The region is associated with emotional awareness and empathy, the researchers said.


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Flu Risk May Depend on Birth Year

The year in which you were born may predict your risk of getting some types of the flu, a new study of people in Asia and the Middle East suggests. Researchers found that the people in this study who were born before 1968 were less susceptible to a certain strain of the flu than those born in 1968 or later, because this older group had been more exposed to a similar strain as children. In the study, the researchers looked at data from more than 1,400 people, predominantly in Asia and the Middle East, who had been infected at any point in their lives with two strains of the bird flu called H5N1 and H7N9.


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Morphing Wings Are 1st Step Toward Bird-Like Aircraft

Nowadays, conventional aircraft typically rely on hinged flaps known as ailerons to help control the way the planes tilt as they fly. Instead, the technology will likely first be tested on unmanned aircraft, leading to drones that can fly for long times, to help deliver internet access or medicine to remote villages, he said.


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