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Showing posts from November 7, 2016

'Lazy mosquitoes' mean more women than men get chikungunya: scientists

By Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - "Lazy mosquitoes" are the reason why women, who tend to spend more time at home than men, are more likely to be infected by chikungunya, a painful mosquito-borne viral disease which spreads the same way as Zika, researchers said on Monday. Chikungunya, which is commonly transmitted by the daytime-biting aedes aegypti mosquito, can cause debilitating symptoms including fever, headache and severe joint pain lasting months. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, analysed a 2012 outbreak of chikungunya in the Bangladeshi village of Palpara, around 100 km (60 miles) from the capital Dhaka.

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'Lazy mosquitoes' mean more women than men get chikungunya: scientists

By Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - "Lazy mosquitoes" are the reason why women, who tend to spend more time at home than men, are more likely to be infected by chikungunya, a painful mosquito-borne viral disease which spreads the same way as Zika, researchers said on Monday. Chikungunya, which is commonly transmitted by the daytime-biting aedes aegypti mosquito, can cause debilitating symptoms including fever, headache and severe joint pain lasting months. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, analyzed a 2012 outbreak of chikungunya in the Bangladeshi village of Palpara, around 100 km (60 miles) from the capital Dhaka.

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Why Are Thousands of Snowballs Popping Up on a Siberian Beach?

The best place to stock up on ammo may be a beach in Siberia, where thousands of huge, perfectly round snowballs are piling up, according to news reports. Villagers near the Gulf of Ob in Siberia discovered the snowballs along an 11-mile (18 kilometers) stretch of the beach, reported the Siberian Times. According to news reports, the snowballs first formed in late October, after water in the Gulf of Ob rose and covered the beach in ice.


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'Lazy mosquitoes' mean more women than men get chikungunya: scientists

By Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - "Lazy mosquitoes" are the reason why women, who tend to spend more time at home than men, are more likely to be infected by chikungunya, a painful mosquito-borne viral disease which spreads the same way as Zika, researchers said on Monday. Chikungunya, which is commonly transmitted by the daytime-biting aedes aegypti mosquito, can cause debilitating symptoms including fever, headache and severe joint pain lasting months. A new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, analysed a 2012 outbreak of chikungunya in the Bangladeshi village of Palpara, around 100 km (60 miles) from the capital Dhaka.

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First-Ever Dinosaur Brain Tissue Found

What was going on in dinosaurs' noggins as they dwelled in Cretaceous forests, stalking fierce prey or sitting on a nest of giant eggs? Paleontologists may never know the answer to these questions, but they just got one step closer with the first-ever discovery of brain tissue from a dinosaur. Discovering any soft tissue from a dinosaur is rare since that material degrades faster than other types of tissue, and dinosaurs lived more than 66 million years ago.


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Inside Ireland's Oldest Grave, an 'Exceptional' Find

Ireland's oldest human grave has become even more exceptional for one of its contents: The oldest polished ax on record in Europe was likely created solely for a burial, archaeologists say. The finding sheds new light on the beliefs and complex funerary rituals of the early Mesolithic hunter-gatherers who lived in Ireland about 9,500 years ago, from about 7530 B.C., the researchers said. "This type of insight into burial practices is incredibly rare for this part of the world," the study's lead researcher Aimée Little, an archaeologist at the University of York in the United Kingdom, told Live Science in an email.


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Weird 'Gravity' Waves Above Antarctica Caused by Ice Vibrations

Stretching between Antarctica and the Ross Sea, the Ross Ice Shelf is the world’s largest body of ice. Since ice thickness is one factor that determines the size of the resulting atmospheric ripples, scientists could someday use measurements in the air disruptions to monitor the Ross Ice Shelf, said lead study author Oleg Godin, a professor of physics at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. The atmospheric waves, also sometimes referred to as gravity waves, were found in lidar measurements taken between 2011 and 2015 at the research station in McMurdo Sound on Ross Island, which is one of the anchors of the Ross Ice Shelf.


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Jackpot! Hiker Discovers Ancient Reptile Footprints Near Las Vegas

The ancient environment preserved this creature's footprints in a fossilized trackway that researchers are calling Chelichnus gigas. That's because like many four-legged (or tetrapodal) animals, this ancient critter's back feet would have stepped directly on top of the freshly made footprints of its front feet, meaning that the front footprints are obscured by the back ones, said study lead researcher Stephen Rowland, a professor of geology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "The hind footprints are superimposed on the front footprints, so we don't have well-preserved front footprints," Rowland told Live Science.


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An Entire Ecosystem of Creepy-Crawlies May Lurk in Your Home

A new analysis of the insects, spiders and other creepy-crawlies in homes across the United States reveals that the Turkestan cockroach (Shelfordella lateralis), a small introduced species native to Asia, has spread beyond homes in the U.S. South and West and now lives in Northeastern homes, too. The researchers also found a wide diversity of indoor arthropods, a group of animals with exoskeletons that includes insects and spiders. Three factors that were linked with more diversity included living in a rural area, having a basement, or owning a cat or a dog.


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How One Man Fought Off a Great White Shark

Joe Tanner was paddling on his surfboard off the Oregon coast, waiting to catch a wave, when he felt something grab his leg. It was a scenario any surfer or beachgoer would dread: Tanner looked down to find a toothy great white shark. "I remember thinking, 'Thank God I made it to shore,'" Tanner told Live Science.


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Oldest Megamouth Shark on Record Had Chipped Tooth

Based on that tooth, paleontologists have been able to name a previously unknown ancient species of megamouth shark, one that's related to the modern but rarely seen megamouth shark, Megachasma pelagios, the researchers said. The newfound species, called Megachasma alisonae, is the oldest megamouth shark on record, and pushes back the existence of megamouth sharks by 13 million years, said the study's lead researcher Kenshu Shimada, a paleobiologist at DePaul University in Chicago. The distinct shape of the ancient tooth — which looks like a pitchfork with a prominent middle point and two side cusps — indicates that M. alisonae ate small fish, likely "by impaling them on the taller centrally placed crown," said study co-author David Ward, a retired research associate in the Department of Earth Sciences at the Natural History Museum in London, in the United Kingdom.


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World's Oldest Stone Tablet Containing Ten Commandments Up for Auction

Thou shalt not covet … unless you are coveting the world's oldest known example of a stone tablet inscribed with the Ten Commandments. The world's oldest slab with the Decalogue will be up for auction until Nov. 16 in Beverly Hills, California. The 2-foot-long (60 centimeters), 200-lb. (90 kilograms) marble slab, dubbed the "Living Torah," is likely 1,500 to 1,700 years old, according to Heritage Autions, which is running the auction.


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Cancer-Causing List: 7 New Substances Added by US

Six of these substances are listed as "known" to cause cancer, while one is "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen," according to a statement today (Nov. 3) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Five of the new substances on the list are viruses, and all of those are among the "known carcinogens," the NIH says. The viruses include human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1, Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).


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Turns Out, Faking a Smile Might Not Make You Happier After All

The hypothesis, called the facial-feedback hypothesis, dates back to a 1988 study in which participants rated the humor of cartoons while inadvertently mimicking either a smile or a pout. The failure of an idea to hold up in a replication study, however, rarely settles the question of whether or not a result is valid. The originator of the facial-feedback hypothesis, psychologist Fritz Strack of the University of Würzburg in Germany, argued that the replication study changed enough of his original experiment so that it no longer was a true replication.


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What Makes an Earworm So Catchy?

For examples, those "unusual intervals or repetitions" can be heard in the opening riff of "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple or in the chorus of "Bad Romance" by Lady Gaga, Jakubowski said. Among the top tunes that people listed as earworms were "Bad Romance" and "Can't Get You Out of My Head" by Kylie Minogue, the researchers found. Once the researchers had a list of common earworms, they compared these tunes with other songs that, though they reached similar levels of popularity and were released around the same time, had never been deemed earworms.


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Secret German World War II Base Rediscovered Near North Pole

The remains of a secret World War II German base have been rediscovered on an island near the North Pole by a team of Russian researchers. The wartime "Schatzgrabber" ("Treasure Hunter" in German) weather station was built by the German military in 1943 on Alexandra Land, one of the isolated Franz Josef Land islands in the Barents Sea, located more than 680 miles (1,100 kilometers) north of the Russian city of Arkhangelsk. "This summer in the Arctic was very warm, so the entire area of Schatzgrabber was completely free of snow and ice, which made it possible to explore the area fully," team leader Evgeny Ermolov, a senior researcher with the Russian Arctic National Park, which now administers the island, said in a statement.


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Citizen Scientists Jump Aboard NASA's Jupiter Mission to Create Amazing Images

A camera flying aboard NASA's current mission to Jupiter is snapping stunning new images of the gas giant's stormy surface, and enabling members of the public to take an active role in this historic mission. The Juno probe is flying closer to Jupiter than any spacecraft has done in history, coming to within about 3,100 miles (5,000 kilometers) of the giant's stormy cloud tops. The JunoCam instrument is an exception: It takes pictures of the surface of Jupiter's cloud tops.


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