Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from October 27, 2016

Scientists identify fossilized dinosaur brain tissue for first time

British and Australian scientists have identified an unassuming brown pebble, found more than a decade ago by a fossil hunter in southern England, as the first known example of fossilized dinosaur brain tissue. The fossilized brain, found by fossil enthusiast Jamie Hiscocks near Bexhill in Sussex in 2004, is most likely from a species similar to Iguanodon - a large herbivore that lived during the early cretaceous period, some 133 million years ago. In a report of their analysis in a Special Publication of the Geological Society of London, the researchers said they believed this piece of tissue was so well-preserved because the dinosaur's brain was "pickled" in a highly acidic and low-oxygen body of water – like a bog or swamp – shortly after it died.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2eULuqo
via RO Water Filter

Scientists identify fossilised dinosaur brain tissue for first time

British and Australian scientists have identified an unassuming brown pebble, found more than a decade ago by a fossil hunter in southern England, as the first known example of fossilised dinosaur brain tissue. The fossilised brain, found by fossil enthusiast Jamie Hiscocks near Bexhill in Sussex in 2004, is most likely from a species similar to Iguanodon - a large herbivore that lived during the early cretaceous period, some 133 million years ago. In a report of their analysis in a Special Publication of the Geological Society of London, the researchers said they believed this piece of tissue was so well-preserved because the dinosaur's brain was "pickled" in a highly acidic and low-oxygen body of water – like a bog or swamp – shortly after it died.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2fbqeAu
via RO Water Filter

Scientists identify fossilised dinosaur brain tissue for first time

British and Australian scientists have identified an unassuming brown pebble, found more than a decade ago by a fossil hunter in southern England, as the first known example of fossilised dinosaur brain tissue. The fossilised brain, found by fossil enthusiast Jamie Hiscocks near Bexhill in Sussex in 2004, is most likely from a species similar to Iguanodon - a large herbivore that lived during the early cretaceous period, some 133 million years ago. In a report of their analysis in a Special Publication of the Geological Society of London, the researchers said they believed this piece of tissue was so well-preserved because the dinosaur's brain was "pickled" in a highly acidic and low-oxygen body of water – like a bog or swamp – shortly after it died.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2eJYm28
via RO Water Filter

New 3D printed microscope lets kids 'play' microbiology

By Ben Gruber PALO ALTO (Reuters) - Playing classic video games like Pac-Man with living single-celled microbes thinner than a human hair is now possible thanks to an interactive microscope developed by bioengineers at Stanford University. “It’s a microscope that you can 3D print and build yourself,” Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, told Reuters. After it is assembled, tiny, light-responsive organisms called Euglena swim on a microscope slide surrounded by four LED lights.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2eUxKMu
via RO Water Filter

Huge Magma Chamber Created Enormous Dome in Central Andes

A massive magma chamber in South America that pumps melted rock into the Earth's crust created an enormous dome in the central Andes, within the second-highest continental plateau in the world, according to a new study. Researchers studying the seismology and topography of the Altiplano-Puna plateau have connected the existence of a huge, underlying magma body to the plateau's great heights. The Altiplano-Puna plateau, which has an altitude of 13,000 feet (4,000 meters), includes parts of Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, and encompasses vast plains punctuated by volcanoes.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2ef6gQh
via RO Water Filter

Encoded Bling: Diamonds Could Store Huge Amounts of Data

"We are the first group to demonstrate the possibility of using diamond as a platform for the superdense memory storage," said study lead author Siddharth Dhomkar, a physicist at the City College of New York. The scientists detailed their findings online today (Oct. 26) in the journal Science Advances.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2dM1Ynq
via RO Water Filter

Original Emoji Will Go on Display at Museum of Modern Art

Before the "hearts-for-eyes" face, the praying hands and the notorious eggplant, there was the very first set of emoji — an assortment of small and now-primitive pictographs that include a green coffee mug, a blue airplane and a purple face with two carets for eyes and a tiny rectangle for a mouth. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City announced yesterday (Oct. 26) that it has acquired the original 176 emoji for its permanent collection, reported The New York Times. MoMA will feature the emoji in the museum's lobby starting in December, as part of an exhibit that includes other graphics and animations.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2ef5bbr
via RO Water Filter

Men's Resting Heart Rates May Be Linked with Their Mental Health

Young men with elevated heart rates and high blood pressure may have an increased risk of developing certain mental health disorders later in life, a new study from Sweden finds. The men's resting heart rates and blood pressure were recorded during a medical exam they underwent at age 18 when they registered for the Swedish Armed Forces, which was mandatory until 2010. To determine which of these men developed a mental illness at any point after their exam, the researchers looked at Sweden's National Patient Register, which contains information about all psychiatric inpatient admissions in Sweden since 1973 and both inpatient and outpatient treatments since 2001.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2dLRQLj
via RO Water Filter

HIV's 'Patient Zero' Wrongly Blamed for AIDS Epidemic

A man who was believed to have introduced HIV to North America — the man sometimes referred to as "Patient Zero" — was actually not the initial source of the virus on this continent, new research shows. Rather, this man was one of the thousands of people in North America who were infected with HIV in the years before the virus was officially recognized, according to the new findings published today (Oct. 26) in the journal Nature. The man, GaĆ©tan Dugas, was a Canadian flight attendant, and was thought to have introduced HIV into one or more major U.S. cities by infecting his sexual partners, setting off the AIDS crisis that struck the U.S. in the 1980s, the researchers said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2eeQuF3
via RO Water Filter

ER Visits for Alcohol Intoxication Are Going Up

Visits to the emergency room for alcohol intoxication in the United States have increased by more than 50 percent over the past decade, a new study finds. What's more, ER visits tied to alcohol are taking up an increasing portion of hospital resources, and are requiring longer hospital stays than in the past, the researchers said. There is a need for more attention to efforts to identify and reduce problematic drinking, which could also help to reduce alcohol-related ER visits, they said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/2dLTeOe
via RO Water Filter