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Showing posts from October 14, 2016

Women's Brains Grow a Bit During Menstrual Cycle

Women experience monthly hormone fluctuations that influence the switching that takes place between their infertile and fertile days, and in a small new study of 30 women, the researchers showed that these estrogen-level changes also affect the hippocampus — the area of the brain that is central to memories, mood and emotions. As the estrogen levels rose, the hippocampus increased slightly in volume, the study showed. The researchers' measurements showed that both the grey and white matter in the brain increased as estrogen levels rose, causing the hippocampus to increase in volume.


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Why Sexual Assault Victims Wait to Speak Out

Recently, several women have accused Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump of sexual assault. But just because a victim doesn't come forward right away about sexual assault doesn't mean the accusations are untrue, said Yolanda Moses, a professor of anthropology at the University of California, Riverside and a consultant/trainer for preventing sexual harassment and sexual assault. Indeed, there are many reasons why victims of sexual assault may hesitate to speak out immediately after an incident.


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The Bizarre History of 'Tetris'

"Tetris," the hugely popular and addictive game that swept the world in the 1980s and 1990s, continues to engage and captivate players today. Unlike the majority of products developed during the early boom years of video game design, "Tetris" was a no-frills outlier: no fancy images, no memorable characters and no narrative. In a new nonfiction graphic novel titled "Tetris: The Games People Play" (First Second, Oct. 2016), writer and illustrator Box Brown fits together the puzzle pieces that describe the explosive gaming-world takeover of "Tetris," uncovering the unique historical circumstances in world politics and the nascent gaming industry that made the "Tetris" story so unique.


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80 Years Later, Polar Explorer's Sunken Ship Floats Again

For the first time in more than 80 years, the Maud is floating above the sea surface. The sturdy oak ship, made to withstand Arctic winters stuck in pack ice, was originally built for the Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen, the first human to arrive at the South Pole. The Maud is "ready for the next step, which is to sail home," project manager Jan Wanggaard told Live Science.


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How One Scientist Decoded the Mysterious Sounds of the Northern Lights

For more than 15 years, a lone scientist in southern Finland has spent countless winter nights among the snowy fields and frozen lakes around his village, in pursuit of one of the most ephemeral mysteries of the heavens: the faint, almost phantasmagorical sounds heard during intense displays of the aurora borealis, or northern lights. The epic study by acoustician Unto K. Laine includes the first audio recordings of the muffled crackling or popping sometimes heard overhead during spectacular aurora displays. Over the years, the sounds of the northern lights have been explained as illusions, imagination, inebriation or even voices from the spiritual world.


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Your Brain on Tetris: How Video Game Seduced Millions

In the 1980s, a humble yet compelling computer puzzle game called Tetris unexpectedly transformed into an addictive global phenomenon that consumed countless waking hours of obsessed players around the world. The remarkable and largely unknown story behind the game that transfixed millions — and continues to do so today — unfolds in the nonfiction graphic novel, "Tetris: The Games People Play," by Box Brown, released in the U.S. Oct. 11 by First Second Books. When Brown discovered a 2004 BBC documentary about Tetris, he was inspired to dig deeper into the game's backstory, which began in the former Soviet Union.


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Scientists seek to map all human cells in vast atlas

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists launched a global initiative on Friday to map out and describe every cell in the human body in a vast atlas that could transform researchers' understanding of human development and disease. The atlas, which is likely to take more than a decade to complete, aims to chart the types and properties of all human cells across all tissues and organs and build a reference map of the healthy human body, the scientists said. Cells are fundamental to understanding the biology of all health and disease, but scientists cannot yet say how many we have, how many different types there are, or how they differ from one organ to another, one project leader said.

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5 Misconceptions About Sexual Assault

Among the many reactions to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's lewd conversation in 2005, the question of whether what Trump was describing constituted sexual assault has struck a cord — and caused a sharp divide.


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Brain-Implanted Device Restores Sense of Touch in Man with Spinal Cord Injury

This is the first time such a device has been used to restore a sense of touch in a person with a spinal cord injury, the researchers said. The patient, although paralyzed by his injury, could experience the sensations through a mind-controlled robotic arm connected directly to his brain, the researchers said. In the winter of 2004, he was driving at night in rainy weather and was in a car crash that snapped his neck and injured his spinal cord.


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Heart-Harming Supplements? Calcium Pills Linked to Artery Buildup

People who take calcium supplements may be at increased risk for developing buildups of plaque in their arteries, which is a sign of heart disease, a new study found. However, people who consume a lot of calcium through the food they eat may actually be at a lower risk of heart disease, the study showed. The findings add to a growing body of evidence that some dietary supplements, such as calcium supplements, may have harmful effects.


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Scientists seek to map all human cells in vast atlas

By Kate Kelland LONDON, (Reuters) - Scientists launched a global initiative on Friday to map out and describe every cell in the human body in a vast atlas that could transform researchers' understanding of human development and disease. The atlas, which is likely to take more than a decade to complete, aims to chart the types and properties of all human cells across all tissues and organs and build a reference map of the healthy human body, the scientists said. Cells are fundamental to understanding the biology of all health and disease, but scientists cannot yet say how many we have, how many different types there are, or how they differ from one organ to another, one project leader said.

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Mom's Antidepressant Use May Increase Baby's Risk of Speech Disorders

Children born to women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may have an increased risk of language and speech disorders, according to a new study from Finland. In the study, children born to mothers who had depression and bought antidepressants at least twice during pregnancy were 37 percent more likely to develop speech or language disorders over the course of the 14-year study, compared with children born to women who had depression but did not buy any antidepressants during pregnancy, the researchers found.


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The Universe Has 10 Times More Galaxies Than Scientists Thought

More than a trillion galaxies are lurking in the depths of space, a new census of galaxies in the observable universe has found — 10 times more galaxies than were previously thought to exist. An international team of astronomers used deep-space images and other data from the Hubble Space Telescope   to create a 3D map of the known universe, which contains about 100 to 200 billion galaxies. In particular, they relied on Hubble's Deep Field images, which revealed the most distant galaxies ever seen with a telescope.


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