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Showing posts from September 19, 2016

Japan's Hinode Sun Observatory Celebrates 10 Years of Solar Science

Japan's Hinode sun-observing satellite has delivered spectacular imagery and invaluable measurements of the sun since it launched into space 10 years ago on Sept. 23, 2006. Hinode is part of an international mission led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with NASA and other partners. Over the course of a decade, the spacecraft has provided remarkable views of violent solar flares, eruptions, transits across the sun and much more.


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Childhood Cancer Deaths: Brain Cancer Overtakes Leukemia as Top Cause

Leukemia is no longer the No. 1 cause of cancer deaths in children, but brain cancer has taken it's place, according to a new report. All pediatric cancer death rates have been dropping since the mid-1970s, according to the report released today (Sept. 16) from the National Center for Health Statistics. "The shift from leukemia to brain cancer as the leading site of cancer death is a noteworthy development in the history of childhood cancer as it was always leukemia until quite recently," said lead author Sally Curtin, demographer and statistician at the NCHS, which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in an email interview with Live Science.

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Heart Found in Plastic Bag: How Officials Could Test if It's Human

Officials in Ohio said more tests are needed to determine whether a heart found on the ground, in a zip-close bag, is actually a human organ, or if it comes from another animal. The heart was discovered about three weeks ago on a patch of grass near a gas station in Norwalk, Ohio, according to The New York Times. Experts can't always tell whether a heart is from a human or another animal just by looking at it, said Dr. Gregory G. Davis, a professor of pathology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, and chief coroner for Jefferson County, Alabama, who is not involved in the investigation.

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'Pokémon Go' Risks: Drivers and Pedestrians Warned on Traffic Dangers

'Pokémon Go' could be a source of distracted driving and other traffic-related incidents, a new study finds.


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Canada Approves Prescription Heroin: Here's What That Means

Doctors in Canada can now prescribe heroin to patients with particularly serious addictions to the drug, thanks to new rules that were recently approved by the country's government. The rules, which went into effect last week, allow any doctor in Canada to apply to the country's national health department (known as Health Canada) for access to medical-grade heroin to prescribe to specific patients. The requests are approved on a case-by-case basis, by the government-run Special Access Programme, according to the new regulations.

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NASA's IceBridge Mission Checks Summer Melt at Greenland Ice Sheet

Operation IceBridge, NASA's airborne survey of polar ice, uses a fleet of research aircraft to monitor the polar regions' annual changes due to climate change. The current Greenland mission, which lasts until Sept. 16, will mostly replicate an earlier survey from May so that scientists can observe any changes between spring and late summer. "Earlier in IceBridge's history, we only surveyed the elevation of these glaciers once a year," Joe MacGregor, IceBridge's deputy project scientist, said in a statement.


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Bobblehead Bats: Head Waggles Help Catch Prey

"The sound is going to be hitting the ears in different ways throughout that dynamic process, and it's those differences the bats exploit," said study author Melville Wohlgemuth, a postdoctoral researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Wohlgemuth said he and his colleagues are interested in the ways the brain integrates auditory information and vocalizations. The bats hear these echoes and adjust their movements and future vocalizations to better capture prey.


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Shocking News: World's Longest Lightning Bolt Was Nearly 200 Miles

When the world's longest lightning bolt struck over Oklahoma in 2007, it traveled about three-quarters of the length of the state, according to the World Meteorological Organization, which recently announced the electrifying new record. The lightning bolt traveled 199.5 miles (321 kilometers) on June 20, 2007, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said. The two announcements mark the first time that lightning has been included in the official WMO World Weather & Climate Extremes Archive, whichdocuments records for heat, cold, wind speed, rainfall and other climate events.


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