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Showing posts from September 2, 2016

SpaceX to shift Florida launches to new pad after explosion

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - SpaceX said on Friday it would shift Florida flights to a nearly completed second site after damage to its launch pad on Thursday from the explosion of a rocket belonging to the space services company run by Elon Musk. The Federal Aviation Administration has sent seven people to Florida to supervise investigation of the disaster, said FAA spokesman Hank Price. The agency, which oversees U.S. commercial rocket launches, requires that SpaceX’s flights be suspended pending results of the probe.


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SpaceX assessing launch pad damage after explosion at Cape Canaveral

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Damage to a launch pad from the explosion of a SpaceX rocket on Thursday may send the private space services company run by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk scrambling to finish a second Florida launch site, officials said on Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration has sent seven people to Florida to supervise investigation of the disaster, said FAA spokesman Hank Price. The agency, which oversees U.S. commercial rocket launches, requires that SpaceX’s flights be suspended pending results of the probe.


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Lasting Childbirth Pain Tied to Postpartum Depression

Women who continue to experience pain from childbirth one month after having a baby may be more likely to develop postpartum depression, a new study suggests. Specifically, researchers found that women in Singapore who had pain that lasted longer than four weeks after they gave birth had higher scores on tests that measured the women's risk for postpartum depression. The findings suggest that persistent childbirth pain in women is linked with a greater risk for postpartum depression, said Dr. Ban Leong Sng, the senior author of the study and the deputy head of the department of women's anesthesia at KK Women's and Children's Hospital in Singapore.

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US Marijuana Use Grows As Fewer People Worry About the Risks

Marijuana use is on the rise in the U.S., and one reason may be that people perceive the drug as less harmful than people did in the past, according to new research. The authors of the new study say their findings, published today (Aug. 31) in the journal The Lancet Psychiatry, suggest that more education about the risks of marijuana is needed. Other reports have also shown that marijuana use is increasing, said lead authorDr.

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Why Taller People May Be Better at Judging How Far Away Things Are

The human brain depends on a certain model to provide "the best guess of where objects could be located," said study co-author Teng Leng Ooi, a professor of optometry at The Ohio State University. "Our previous studies have shown that the intrinsic bias is an imaginary curve that extends from one's feet and slants upward to the far distance," Ooi told Live Science in an email. Over three experiments, objects were presented in different levels of light, with different amounts of information to help determine location.

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Scary Cave Spider? No, They're New Beetle Species

The study, based on molecular analysis of the cave beetle DNA, created a new genus, Graciliella, which contains at least four species of the beetle. The study was led by Iva Njunji?, a cave biologist at the University of Novi Sad in Serbia. Serbia, Montenegro, Croatia and nearby Balkan nations sit atop multiple cave systems, which are home to a variety of bizarre cave-adapted organisms.


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Dogs use same parts of brain to process speech as humans, Hungarian study says

By Krisztina Than BUDAPEST (Reuters) - "Super, well done," her trainer says, and Maya, a Hungarian golden retriever, happily holds up her left paw, responding to the praise. Maya works with a group of Hungarian researchers at the Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest, who have scanned the brains of 13 dogs, finding that dogs process words and intonation to work out messages similarly to humans. The study showed that dogs, like people, use the left hemisphere of their brain to process words, and a right hemisphere brain region to process intonation.


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