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Showing posts from August 12, 2016

Junk food fight: Science tests how birds compete for Cheetos

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the early bird that gets the Cheetos. But it's the bigger bird that steals it away.


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Rare tarantulas hatch at British zoo

(Reuters) - A clutch of around 200 rare Montserrat tarantulas have successfully hatched at a British zoo in what keepers hailed on Friday as a first in breeding such spiders. "Invertebrate keepers at the zoo are the first in the world to successfully breed the Montserrat tarantulas, marking a crucial step towards discovering more about the mysterious species," Chester Zoo said in a statement. Little is known about the spiders, which are native to the Montserrat island in the Caribbean.

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These Jobs Are Linked to the Worst Heart Health

Truck drivers and social service workers have something in common: The people who work in these two occupations are the least likely to be heart healthy, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To determine how heart healthy people were, the researchers counted up how many of the American Heart Association's seven "ideal" metrics of heart health each person met: whether they refrained from smoking, were physically active, had normal blood pressure and  normal blood glucose, were an ideal weight, registered normal cholesterol levels and ate a healthy diet. Overall, they found that 3.5 percent of all workers met all seven of the heart-healthy metrics according to the report, published today (Aug. 11).

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The 'Doping Arms Race': How Athletes Evade Testing

However, testing athletes for doping can be complicated, as there is no single test that can reveal if an athlete has taken a suspected drug or used any of the banned performance-enhancing techniques, such as blood doping. Rather, each drug — and there are hundreds — requires its own test, said Rhonda Orr, a senior lecturer in exercise and sport science at the University of Sydney in Australia. "A specific, standardized testing regime has been tailored for each drug," Orr told Live Science.

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Woman's 'Double Uterus' Case Highlights the Mysteries of HPV

A woman with a rare condition that gave her two uteruses, along with two cervixes, had an even more unusual case of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, according to a new report of her case. The 35-year-old Massachusetts woman had a rare condition called uterine didelphys, which happens when the uterus doesn't form properly during development and instead forms two uteruses. The woman also had two cervixes (the neck-like structure that connects the uterus to the vagina), but one vagina, which is not unusual for people with this condition.

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Why Guys Should Not Drink After Exercising

Getting drunk may undo the effects of an intense workout, at least for men, new research suggests. Men in the study who drank alcohol after doing heavy strength training showed reduced levels of the chemical signals that spur muscle growth and repair compared to men who did not drink, according to a new study that will be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. "A little bit of alcohol is probably not a problem," said study co-author Jakob Vingren, a biology and kinesiology professor at the University of North Texas in Denton.

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Greenland Sharks May Live 400 Years

Greenland sharks are slow. Researchers suspected that Greenland sharks' exceptionally slow growth meant that they lived a long time, but they had no idea just how long that might be. A new study provides the first estimates for Greenland shark longevity, and shows that these slowpokes of the sea stick around a very long time — at least 272 years, and perhaps as long as 390 years on average, making them longer-lived than any other vertebrate in the world.


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Newfound Glow-in-the-Dark Fish Identified

In doing so, the scientists found three different pigment patterns, suggesting three distinct species. Differences in mitochondrial DNA, the genetic material of the structure within cells that generates energy,supported this conclusion.


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Ancient Greek Skeleton May Be Remains of Human Sacrifice to Zeus

A 3,000-year-old skeleton has been discovered at an altar dedicated to Zeus at Mount Lykaion in Greece, and archaeologists say the new finding may be the remains of a human sacrifice offered to the Greek god. The discovery was announced Wednesday (Aug. 10) in a statement from the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Education and Religious Affairs. Archaeologists from the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project excavated the skeleton, which appears to be that of a male teenager, this summer.


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Ghost in the Machine: Atom Smasher's 'New Particle' Was Illusion

In December 2015, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world's largest particle accelerator — thought they may have seen a hint of a brand-new particle, and with it, a window into physics beyond what scientists know now. Yet despite the negative result, the fact that there is nothing there shows that reigning theories of particle physics are working remarkably well, experts said. "The bad news is [the measurements] don't show anything," said theoretical physicist Matt Strassler.


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As Earth swelters, global warming target in danger of being missed

By Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - The Earth is so hot this year that a limit for global warming agreed by world leaders at a climate summit in Paris just a few months ago is in danger of being breached. In December, almost 200 nations agreed a radical shift away from fossil fuels with a goal of limiting a rise in average global temperatures to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times while "pursuing efforts" for 1.5C (2.7F). "The future debate about temperature targets will be about overshoot." Many climate scientists say the Paris targets are likely to be breached in the coming decades, shifting debate onto whether it will be possible to turn down the global thermostat.


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