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Showing posts from July 25, 2016

Solar-powered plane circles globe, returns to UAE

By Stanley Carvalho ABU DHABI (Reuters) - A solar-powered aircraft successfully completed the first fuel-free flight around the world on Tuesday, returning to Abu Dhabi after an epic 16-month voyage and demonstrating the potential of renewable energy. The plane, Solar Impulse 2, touched down in the United Arab Emirates capital at 0005 GMT (0405 local time) on Tuesday. It first took off from Abu Dhabi on March 9, 2015, beginning a landmark journey of about 40,000 km (24,500 miles) around the globe and nearly 500 hours of flying.


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Fish can recognise human faces, study finds

By Matthew Stock Scientists have shown for the first time how a species of tropical fish can distinguish between human faces. The archerfish used in experiments could demonstrate the ability to a high degree of accuracy; despite lacking the crucial neocortex part of the brain which other animals use for sophisticated visual recognition. ...

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What If the Moon Disappeared Tomorrow?

That's right, it was the moon! The moon makes some pretty nice tides, but the Earth is also spinning on its axis. By the way, the moon is slowly getting farther away from Earth. The Earth's axis is tilted, and that tilt can change with time.


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How Your Sandwich Could Be Hurting Your Diet

The study found that on the days that people ate sandwiches, they consumed nearly 100 more calories, as well as more sodium, fat and sugar, compared to the days when they didn't eat sandwiches. The sandwiches that Americans typically consume tend to be high in calories, fat and sodium, and low in produce, study co-author Ruopeng An, an assistant professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, told Live Science. The finding suggests that people should pay attention to the nutrition content of their sandwiches.

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Depressed Patients Do Well with Cheaper Treatment

Many people with depression struggle to get treatment for the condition, in part because "talk therapy" can be expensive, and there aren't enough qualified therapists to deliver it. But now, a new study suggests that a simple and relatively cheap type of talk therapy may work just as well at treating depression as the current "gold standard" treatment. The findings suggest that using this simpler therapy — called behavioral activation — on a wide scale could improve access to treatment for depression and reduce health care costs, the researchers said.

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Bartender, Beware: Squeezing Limes Can Cause 'Margarita Burn'

Just ask Justin Fehntrich, who developed second-degree burns on his hand after spending a sunny afternoon squeezing limes for margaritas last month. The "margarita burn" phenomenon, known as phytophotodermatitis, occurs when a person gets a compound called psoralen on his or her skin, said Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Once activated, it makes the skin "exquisitely sensitive" to light, she told Live Science.

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Do Your Ears Ring? How to Deal with Tinnitus

About one in 10 American adults has a persistent ringing or roaring in the ears or head, a condition called chronic tinnitus, a new study suggests. The study also found that the rates of tinnitus are higher among Americans who are regularly exposed to noisy environments, either at work or during their free time. But the study's estimated prevalence of tinnitus may be on the low side because "other similar studies have reported even higher rates of tinnitus," said lead author Dr. Harrison Lin, an ear, nose and throat specialist at the University of California, Irvine.

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Ultrathin Electric 'Tattoo' Can Monitor Muscles and More

It's a temporary tattoo more advanced than anything you'll ever find in a Cracker Jack box: Researchers have developed a thin, flexible electrode that can measure electrical signals on the skin after being applied like a temporary tattoo. The technology was designed to make long-term, stable recordings of muscle activity without inconveniencing the person wearing it. "The key innovation is making the electrodes extremely thin," study leader Yael Hanein, an associate professor of electrical engineering at Tel Aviv University in Israel, told Live Science in an email.


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That's Insane! Daring Skydiver 'Surfs' on Storm Clouds

Earlier this month, MacCormac, a member of the Red Bull Air Force's collection of skydivers and pilots, strapped a board to his feet and "surfed" down the edge of a storm cloud over central Florida. "It's one of those things that's so wrong," MacCormac told Live Science. What may be even more unreasonable is that this wasn't MacCormac's first jump into a thunderstorm.


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Bloody Leaves from King Albert's Deadly Fall Are Authentic, DNA Shows

Using DNA tests, scientists have confirmed the authenticity of a morbid souvenir: bloodstained leaves that were taken from the death site of Belgium's King Albert I more than 80 years ago. The results of the new study might help put to bed some conspiracy theories that claim Albert was the victim of murder, not a climbing accident. Albert, who ruled from 1909 until his death, was celebrated for his role in World War I, as he refused to let German troops through Belgium to attack France.


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Nectartini? This Little Lemur Has a Taste for Alcohol

In the new study, the researchers wanted to investigate whether alcohol was part of the aye-ayes' regular diet. But aye-ayes also use this finger to probe for nectar in a plant called the traveler's tree, also native to Madagascar. Previous observations of aye-ayes showed that they spend as much as 20 percent of their feeding time during the rainy season searching for and devouring the liquid treat.


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Mysterious Green Foam Spews from Drain in Utah

This month has brought flora troubles to Utah, with a green foam bubbling through a street vent and a poop-fueled algae bloom covering the state's third-largest lake. Residents in Bluffdale, Utah, located about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Salt Lake City, were shocked to find a green, foam-like substance coming out of a roadway drain on Thursday (July 21). Bluffdale city officials were concerned that the mysterious green blob was related to the toxic algae bloom currently affecting the Utah Lake area, and called the Salt Lake County Health Department to investigate.


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