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Showing posts from June 8, 2016

Scientists decipher 11 subtypes in acute leukaemia gene study

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists unpicking the gene faults behind an aggressive blood cancer called acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have found it is not a single disease, but at least 11 different ones with important differences for patients' likely survival chances. The findings, from the largest study of its kind, could improve clinical trials for testing and developing new AML drugs and change the way patients are diagnosed and treated in future, according to the international team of researchers. "We have shown that AML is an umbrella term for a group of at least 11 different types of leukaemia," said Peter Campbell, who co-led the study from Britain's Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

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Scientists decipher 11 subtypes in acute leukemia gene study

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists unpicking the gene faults behind an aggressive blood cancer called acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have found it is not a single disease, but at least 11 different ones with important differences for patients' likely survival chances. The findings, from the largest study of its kind, could improve clinical trials for testing and developing new AML drugs and change the way patients are diagnosed and treated in future, according to the international team of researchers. "We have shown that AML is an umbrella term for a group of at least 11 different types of leukemia," said Peter Campbell, who co-led the study from Britain's Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

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New fossils may settle debate over 'Hobbit' people's ancestry

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fossils unearthed on the Indonesian island of Flores may resolve one of the most intriguing mysteries in anthropology: the ancestry of the extraordinary diminutive human species dubbed the "Hobbit."Scientists on Wednesday described bone fragments and teeth about 700,000 years old retrieved from an ancient river bed that appear to belong to the extinct Hobbit species, previously known only from fossils and stone tools from a Flores cave ranging from 190,000 to 50,000 years old. The species, called Homo floresiensis, stood about 3-1/2 feet tall (106 cm), possessing a small, chimpanzee-sized brain. The new fossils "strongly suggest" the Hobbit evolved from large-bodied, large-brained members of the extinct human species Homo erectus living in Asia, said palaeoanthropologist Yousuke Kaifu of the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo.


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UK scientists find new 3-parent IVF technique safe in lab tests

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A study of a new 3-parent IVF technique designed to reduce the risk of mothers passing hereditary diseases to their babies has found it is likely to work well and lead to normal pregnancies, British scientists said. Britain's parliament voted last year to become the first in the world to allow the 3-parent in-vitro-fertilization (IVF)technique, which doctors say will prevent incurable inherited diseases but critics see as a step towards "designer babies". Having completed pre-clinical tests involving more than 500 eggs from 64 donor women, researchers from Britain's Newcastle University said the technique, called “early pronuclear transfer”, does not harm early embryonic development.

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Why Are Shark Attacks on the Rise?

Shark attacks have dominated Australian headlines during the past week, with two fatalities occurring just a few days apart in waters near Perth. Those attacks may not be just a coincidence or bad luck: Shark attacks have been on the rise, with more attacks reported worldwide last year than in any other year on record, according to an annual survey. The International Shark Attack File (ISAF), a database of shark attacks maintained by the Florida Museum of Natural History (FMNH), includes a yearly summary of so-called "unprovoked attacks" — aggressive interactions initiated by sharks against people in the sharks' habitat, without any prior contact — and tallied 98 such attacks in 2015.

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Retro Robot from the 1920s May Get 2nd Chance at Life

Britain's first robot was a dazzling sight to behold, with broad shoulders, light-bulb eyes and a thick-barreled chest.


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Are 'Hands-Free' Phone Calls Really Safer for Drivers?

"A popular misconception is that using a mobile phone while driving is safe as long as the driver uses a hands-free phone," Graham Hole, a psychology lecturer at the University of Sussex in England and an author of the study, said in a statement. In the first experiment, 60 people, divided into three groups of 20, completed a simulated driving course with a series of road hazards. In the second group, the people were asked true or false questions while they carried out the driving simulation.

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Soda Pop Music? Entertainers Endorse Junk Food, Study Finds

Music may be food for the soul, but the food and beverages that pop singers endorse these days may be more like food for the grave, according to a new study. Nearly every food or beverage endorsed by musicians who scored a hit in the Billboard Hot 100 Chart in the years 2013 and 2014 is unhealthy, the study found. Think Justin Timberlake hawking for McDonald's, Drake selling Sprite, Beyoncé endorsing Pepsi and Britney Spears promoting pork rinds.

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Obesity Rate in US Women Climbs to 40%

The obesity rate among U.S. women continues to tick upward, with the latest study showing that about 40 percent of American women are obese. However, the obesity rate in U.S. men has stayed about the same over the past decade, the study found. In the study, researchers gathered new data on U.S. obesity rates from a national survey conducted during 2013-2014, and also looked at changes in obesity rates over the previous nine-year period.


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