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Showing posts from May 4, 2016

For first time, scientists grow two-week-old human embryos in lab

By Kate Kelland LONDON, (Reuters) - Scientists have for the first time grown human embryos outside of the mother for almost two full weeks into development, giving unique insight into what they say is the most mysterious stage of early human life. Scientists had previously only been able to study human embryos as a culture in a lab dish until the seventh day of development when they had to implant them into the mother's uterus to survive and develop further. "This it the most enigmatic and mysterious stage of human development," said Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a University of Cambridge professor who co-led the work.

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Governments should study worst-case global warming scenarios, former U.N. official says

By Sebastien Malo PISCATAWAY, N.J. (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A United Nations panel of scientists seeking ways for nations to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius should not dissuade governments from concentrating on bleaker scenarios of higher temperatures as well, its former chief said on Wednesday. Nations should be considering the potential impact of temperature rises of much as 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 Fahrenheit), said Robert Watson, former head of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The U.N. panel was assigned to find ways to limit global warming to 1.5C (2.7F) after a 195-nation climate change summit in Paris in December.

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For first time, scientists grow two-week-old human embryos in lab

By Kate Kelland LONDON(Reuters) - Scientists have for the first time grown human embryos outside of the mother for almost two full weeks into development, giving unique insight into what they say is the most mysterious stage of early human life. Scientists had previously only been able to study human embryos as a culture in a lab dish until the seventh day of development when they had to implant them into the mother's uterus to survive and develop further. "This it the most enigmatic and mysterious stage of human development," said Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a University of Cambridge professor who co-led the work.

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Best Treatment for Preschoolers with ADHD Is Not Meds, CDC Urges

Many young children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) aren't receiving the top recommended treatment for the condition, a new report suggests. The report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, looked at insurance claims for 5 million U.S. children, ages 2 to 5, who were all receiving treatment for ADHD. The researchers said they wanted to see how many of these children received behavioral therapy, now recommended as the first treatment to try for young kids who have the condition.


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Deadly Mistakes: Medical Errors Are 3rd Leading Cause of Death

Medical errors may be the third leading cause of death in the United States, a new review suggests. The next most common cause of death after medical errors was chronic lower respiratory infection, which accounted for nearly 150,000 deaths that year, the researchers found. But because of how deaths are currently reported in the U.S., medical errors are rarely listed as the cause of death, said the review, published today (May 3) in the journal BMJ.


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Major Depression Might Be Averted by Online Help: Study

People who may be sliding toward depression might be able to prevent the full-blown disorder by completing some self-help exercises online, a new study suggests. Researchers found that men and women who had some symptoms of depression and used a web-based mental health program that was supported by an online trainer were less likely to experience a major depressive episode during a 1-year follow-up period, compared with people who also had symptoms of depression but were only given online access to educational materials about the signs of depression and its treatment. The results of the study suggest that a web-based, guided self-help intervention could effectively reduce the risk of major depressive disorder or at least delay its onset, said lead study author Claudia Buntrock, a doctoral student in psychology at Leuphana University in Lueneburg, Germany.

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5 Delightfully Tech-y Dresses from the 2016 Met Gala 

This year's Met Gala showed the world what happens when high fashion meets cutting-edge technology. The theme of the gala, which benefits the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute, was "Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology" — and many of the event's celebrity guests took the theme to heart, blending their couture looks with supercool tech. (The event was co-hosted by Apple's chief design officer, Jonathan Ive.) Here are five of Live Science's favorite looks from the star-studded event.


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Land titles for farmers help cut Brazil's forest loss: scientist

By Chris Arsenault RIO DE JANEIRO (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Brazil should speed up its program to grant small farmers formal land ownership to slow down the rate of logging and deforestation, a leading scientist said. Farmers on small holdings are responsible for about 30 percent of the logging and destruction of Brazil's vast forests, up from about 23 percent 10 years ago, said Daniel Nepstad, executive director of the California-based Earth Innovation Institute. "A lack of clear land title pushes small farmers to opt for cattle (rearing) instead of more intensive (food) production" said Nepstad, a specialist with 30 years of experience tracking Amazon deforestation told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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The Real Reason Your Lab Is Fat

When your dog looks up at you hopefully with big, sad eyes, begging for a treat, it can be hard to say no — in spite of your best intentions for restricting your pet to a healthier diet. And one dog breed tests their owners more frequently, with more persistent begging than other breeds, according to a new study. Labrador retrievers were found to be more inclined than other dog breeds to beg for treats, and to generally engage in behaviors related to getting more food.


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