Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from April 1, 2016

Europe gives green light to first gene therapy for children

By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - The world's first life-saving gene therapy for children, developed by Italian scientists and GlaxoSmithKline, has been recommended for approval in Europe, boosting the pioneering technology to fix faulty genes. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) said on Friday it had endorsed the therapy, called Strimvelis, for a tiny number of children with ADA Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) for whom no matching bone marrow donor is available.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1RRiGQd
via RO Water Filter

Hidden King Tut Chambers? Not So Fast, Officials Caution

Egypt's new antiquities minister, Khaled El Anany, sounded caution this morning at a press conference in Luxor over the claim that Tutankhamun's tomb holds two hidden chambers. Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves, of the Amarna Royal Tombs Project, had proposed that two hidden chambers were lurking in the tomb of Tutankhamun and that the hidden rooms may hold the tomb of Queen Nefertiti, the stepmom of King Tutankhamun.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1VgCD1Z
via RO Water Filter

Pentagon awards $75 million for advanced textiles institute

The Pentagon will partner with a consortium of 89 universities, manufacturers, non-profits, and other groups to establish an institute that would research materials "that can see, hear, sense, communicate, store energy, regulate temperature, monitor health, change color, and much more," Defense Secretary Ash Carter said on Friday. Carter announced the initiative in a speech at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which will host the institute. The Pentagon has awarded $75 million for the purpose, funding it said had been matched by over $240 million from non-federal sources.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/21WV8ZK
via RO Water Filter

April Fools' Day! Why People Love Pranks

Pranks have not been thoroughly studied, though researchers have found that people find being tricked a very aversive experience. Prank-based humor can be cruel or kind, loved or hated, but it's anything but simple. Pranks "combine a whole bunch of theories, potentially, of laughter," said Cynthia Gendrich, a professor of acting and directing at Wake Forest University who teaches a seminar on why people laugh.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1PKzGQE
via RO Water Filter

It's a Girl! Ancient Viral Genes May Determine a Baby's Sex

It's a boy! Or maybe it's a girl, but either way, new research suggests that the sex of mouse babies, and perhaps the sex of human babies, may be influenced by a newfound way to deactivate ancient viral genes that have been embedded in mammal genomes for more than a million years. In the research, the scientists looked at viral DNA that is active in the mouse genome. Viral DNA can become part of an animal's genome when a kind of virus called a retrovirus infects a cell, and slips its genes into the DNA of host cells.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1ZQWgi4
via RO Water Filter

Zika Revealed: Here's What a Brain-Cell-Killing Virus Looks Like

The destructive Zika virus has been visualized for the first time, shedding light on similarities and differences between this and related viruses, according to a new study. The new findings may be helpful in developing effective antiviral treatments and vaccines against the Zika virus, the researchers said. "The structure of the virus provides a map that shows potential regions of the virus that could be targeted by a therapeutic treatment, used to create an effective vaccine, or [used] to improve our ability to diagnose and distinguish Zika infection from that of other related viruses," Richard Kuhn, the director of the Purdue University Institute for Inflammation, Immunology and Infectious Diseases in Indiana and a co-author on the study, said in a statement.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1UIbBSP
via RO Water Filter

Tribeca Film Debate: Why the Anti-Vaxxers Just Won't Quit

The anti-vaccination movement regained attention due to actor Robert De Niro's decision late last week to pull the film "Vaxxed" from the Tribeca Film Festival, which he runs. Despite the public pressure to pull the film — not to mention the innumerable studies showing that vaccines are safe — there are many reasons the movement persists, sociologists told Live Science. "We know vaccines carry some risk, and we know that risk is very small," said Jennifer Reich, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Colorado Denver.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1ZQWd5P
via RO Water Filter

5 Ways Science Could Make Football Safer

Now, in response to concerns from the public and players about injuries, research into making football safer has become a leading topic of discussion for the NFL and many sports medicine organizations, experts say. An investigation published last week by The New York Times revealed that concussion research from the National Football League (NFL) was incomplete to the point of being misleading. According to the Times, data that the NFL used in 13 peer-reviewed articles, which supported the NFL's claims that brain injuries from football cause no extended harm to players, left out over 100 diagnosed concussions, including the injury that ended the career of Steve Young.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1UI7RRa
via RO Water Filter

Morgan Freeman Delves into 'The Story of God' in Nat Geo Special

"Over the past few months, I’ve traveled to nearly 20 cities in seven different countries on a personal journey to find answers to the big mysteries of faith," Freeman said in a statement. The idea for the miniseries took root when Freeman was visiting Istanbul about six years ago with film producer Lori McCreary, who helped Freeman found the Revelations Entertainment production company. "The man said no, that Muslims celebrated these stories, too," Freeman said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1SF3u5K
via RO Water Filter

Relic of Beheaded Medieval Swedish King Might Be Authentic

To open a medieval reliquary containing a saint's bones, you have to have a good reason, said Sabine Sten. Sten is an osteoarchaeologist (a type of scientist who studiesskeletal remains from archaeological sites) at Uppsala University in Sweden. Two years ago, she got permission to open a reliquary (a container used to hold objects deemed holy) at the Uppsala Cathedral, to study the bones of Erik Jedvardsson, a medieval Swedish king turned saint.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1MGOhSz
via RO Water Filter

Scientists Hijack Bugs, Turn Them into Cyborgs

For decades, scientists have looked to insects for inspiration when designing robots, with the hope of learning from millions of years of evolution. In the past two decades, instead of attempting to create intricate robots that mimic the complexity of the insect form, researchers have tried hijacking bugs to turn them into robots themselves. Although the researchers acknowledged that cyborg insects do have a number of drawbacks compared to true robots, such as limited life spans, they have several advantages, too.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1SF3rqH
via RO Water Filter

10-Million-Year-Old Snake Revealed in Living Color

The fossilized remains of a snake that lived 10 million years ago don't look very colorful to the naked eye today. Though the pigment grains held within the snake's cells were long gone when scientists discovered the fossil, the cell shapes resembled several types of pigment cells in modern snakes that contain various kinds of color information. Matching the ancient and modern cell shapes allowed researchers to use modern snake color cell data as a road map.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1ZQkKYx
via RO Water Filter