Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from February 29, 2016

Lockheed unit to help design quieter supersonic passenger jet: NASA

(Reuters) - NASA on Monday announced a contract award to Lockheed Martin Corp's unit for the preliminary design of a "low boom" flight demonstration aircraft. NASA's Commercial Supersonic Technology Project had asked industry teams to submit design concepts for a test aircraft that can fly at supersonic speeds, creating a supersonic "heartbeat" - a soft thump rather than the disruptive boom currently associated with supersonic flight.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1T4ZluC
via RO Water Filter

Scientists find Zika increases risk of rare neurological illness

French scientists say they have proved a link between the Zika virus and a nerve syndrome called Guillain-Barre, suggesting countries hit by the Zika epidemic will see a rise in cases of the serious neurological condition. Guillain-Barre (GBS) is a rare syndrome in which the body's immune system attacks part of the nervous system. In a retrospective study analyzing data from a Zika outbreak in French Polynesia during 2013 and 2014, researchers led by Arnaud Fontanet of France's Institut Pasteur calculated the estimated risk of developing Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) at 2.4 for every 10,000 people infected by Zika.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1TiEtjM
via RO Water Filter

Bill Gates 'Discovers' 14-Year-Old Formula on Climate Change

Bill Gates just released a climate science equation that explains how the world can lower carbon dioxide emissions "down to zero," according to the 2016 edition the annual letter he and his wife, Melinda, published. But instead of grilling Gates about the origins of the formula, climate scientists are glad he's talking about it, said Michael Mann, a distinguished professor of atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University. The genesis of Gates' equation might remain a mystery for now — the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation didn't return Live Science's requests for comment.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1OIH8uR
via RO Water Filter

Easter Island Civilization Not Destroyed by War, New Evidence Shows

Thousands of small, sharp, spearlike objects scattered throughout Easter Island have long been presumed to be evidence of massive warfare that led to the demise of its ancient civilization. Easter Island is a tiny landmass located about 2,300 miles (3,700 kilometers) off the coast of Chile. Polynesians first arrived on the island in the 13th century, and Rapa Nui's early inhabitants were famous for the enormous stone statues (called moai) that they built and placed on the coastline.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Uumgit
via RO Water Filter

Rare Charles Darwin Letter Fails to Sell at Auction

A handwritten letter by famed naturalist Charles Darwin to a British marine biologist was put up for auction yesterday (Feb. 25) but failed to sell, according to Nate D. Sanders Auctions, the Los Angeles-based auction house that arranged the sale. The letter, which was originally listed with a minimum bid of $69,500, was expected to be one of several of Darwin's letters to be auctioned off recently, but the historic document did not end up being sold. Last September, a letter in which Darwin expressed his lack of belief in the Bible sold for a record $197,000, according to Bonhams, the British auction house that arranged the sale in New York.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Qo15JD
via RO Water Filter

Funeral Feast? Butchered Turtles in Ancient Grave Hint at Ritual

In an ancient settlement on the banks of the Tigris River in Turkey, archaeologists have made a strange discovery: 17 butchered soft-shelled turtles in the grave of a woman and child. As there are no marks of trauma or injuries, it's not clear how the two people buried with the turtles died.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1oJt9ji
via RO Water Filter

'Mojoe' on the Go: New Thermos Doubles as Portable Coffeemaker

Hyman first dreamed up what would become the mojoe when he was a college student studying late at night in the library. The mojoe is the first of its kind, Hyman said, because unlike other portable coffeemakers on the market, the mojoe does not require you to heat water before brewing, and it can withstand superhot temperatures. To create a self-contained coffee-brewing system within a travel mug, Hyman and his team figured out how to combine aspects of drip brewing with vacuum brewing in a small, light and durable device.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1ThRXwj
via RO Water Filter

Physics of Skipping Stones Could Make Bounceable Naval Weapons

"A text titled 'The Art of Shooting [in] Great Ordnaunce' by William Bourne was likely published in 1578, and is the first known account to mention that if cannonballs are fired at a sufficiently low angle they will ricochet across the water surface," said study co-author Tadd Truscott, a fluid dynamicist at Utah State University in Logan. "This bomb was made to spin at a great rate before impact, enabling it to move along the water surface and avoid torpedo nets on its way to destroy key German dams," Truscott told Live Science. "Water impact has been heavily studied for the past 100 years, with motivations ranging from understanding the physics of seaplane landing to, more commonly, a simple desire to better understand the world in which we live," Truscott said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1oJt8Mo
via RO Water Filter

New Virtual Reality Suit Lets You Reach Out & Touch 'Environment'

Virtual reality could one day incorporate all the senses, creating a rich and immersive experience, but existing virtual reality headsets only simulate things you can see and hear. Designed by Lucian Copeland, Morgan Sinko and Jordan Brooks while they were students at the University of Rochester, in New York, the suit looks something like a bulletproof vest or light armor. In addition, there are small accelerometers embedded in the suit's arms.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1OIirid
via RO Water Filter

At Least 9 Pregnant Women in US Infected with Zika: CDC

Nine pregnant women in the U.S. have now been confirmed to have had Zika virus infections that they contracted through travel to places where the virus is spreading, U.S. health officials said today. Among the nine cases in the pregnant women, three babies have been born, including two who showed no signs of illness and one who had severe microcephaly, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two women are continuing their pregnancies, and so far, there have been no signs of problems with the fetuses.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Uuh0LM
via RO Water Filter

Checking Embryo Viability? Give It a Good Squeeze

In fact, the technique of gently squeezing a series of embryos appears to be the most accurate way for researchers to figure out which one to select for implantation, according to the study published Wednesday (Feb. 24) in the journal Nature Communications. Tests that involve implanting embryos chosen this way into human patients may start soon, the researchers said.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1QGGzTO
via RO Water Filter

How to Gain Weight During Pregnancy, the Healthy Way

Gaining weight during pregnancy is both natural and essential. Women may think that "being pregnant gives them the license to eat anything," said Katherine Tallmadge, a registered dietitian and an op-ed contributor to Live Science. Indeed, studies show that the amount of weight a woman gains during pregnancy plays a major role in how much she'll lose after giving birth.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/21wh1nK
via RO Water Filter

Ancient Stubby-Legged Reptiles with Tiny Heads Were World Travelers

Before dinosaurs roamed the planet, tanklike herbivores called pareiasaurs — barrel-chested and stubby-legged turtle relatives — reigned as Earth's first large plant-eaters. With tiny heads and bony knobs studding their skulls and bodies, pareiasaurs wouldn't have won many beauty contests. Pareiasaurs lived during the Permian era, about 266 million to 252 million years ago.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/24wKHzX
via RO Water Filter

Earth's Early Ocean Was No Scalding Sea

Rocks from the deep past, some 3.5 billion years ago when life first appeared on the planet, were deposited on a deep, cold ocean floor, not in a scalding sea, a new study suggests. "This is the first evidence that over the entire 3.5 billion years, Earth has operated within a temperature range that suits life," said lead study author Maarten de Wit, a professor at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. To take the temperature of Earth's ancient ocean, the researchers trekked to the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1QGnwZO
via RO Water Filter

5D Black Holes Could Break Relativity

Ring-shaped, five-dimensional black holes could break Einstein's theory of general relativity, new research suggests. "Here we may have a first glimpse that four space-time dimensions is a very, very good choice, because otherwise, something pretty bad happens in the universe," said Ulrich Sperhake, a theoretical physicist at the University of Cambridge in England. From the beginning, Einstein's theory of general relativity, which describes how matter warps space-time, predicted its own demise.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1LPv4Z4
via RO Water Filter

Dutch Buzz: Bees Get Smaller, Men Taller

A team of scientists took a closer look at declining bee populations in the Netherlands and discovered something unexpected — it wasn't just the bee populations that were shrinking. Over nearly a century and a half, big-bodied female bee species in the Netherlands have reduced in size by about 7 percent, according to a new study, the first to investigate variations in Dutch bee size over time.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1oSwblZ
via RO Water Filter

Is the Doomsday Clock Still Relevant?

Last month, experts with the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced that the "Doomsday Clock," an iconic symbol meant to represent humanity's risk of facing global calamity, was stuck at 3 minutes to midnight, despite a historic climate agreement reached in Paris just a few months earlier. As part of their reasoning, the atomic bulletin scientists cited the nonbinding nature of those Paris climate accords, the rise of hostility between superpowers and the proliferation of more "modernized" nuclear weapons that may be more tempting to use. Given that, the Doomsday Clock may not be the right tool to mobilize people to actually change things for the better, experts say.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1LPv4YY
via RO Water Filter