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Showing posts from February 23, 2016

Telescope used on Armstrong's moon landing finds new galaxies

By Pauline Askin SYDNEY (Reuters) - An Australian telescope used to broadcast live vision of man's first steps on the moon in 1969 has found hundreds of new galaxies hidden behind the Milky Way by using an innovative receiver that measures radio waves. Scientists at the Parkes telescope, 355 km (220 miles) west of Sydney, said they had detected 883 galaxies, a third of which had never been seen before. The findings were reported in the latest issue of Astronomical Journal under the title 'The Parkes HI Zone of Avoidance Survey'.


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Sexual Spread of Zika May Be More Common than Thought, CDC Warns

Sexual transmission of the Zika virus from men to women may be a more common mode of the virus's spread than researchers previously thought, officials said today. Authorities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and several state public health departments are now investigating 14 new reports of possible sexual transmission of Zika virus. All of them involve men in the United States who had recently traveled to places where the virus is actively spreading, and their female sex partners who had not traveled, the CDC announced today (Feb. 23).


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Satellite operator SES says interested in used SpaceX rocket

By Irene Klotz PORT CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Satellite operator SES SA is interested in buying a used Falcon 9 rocket from Elon Musk’s Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, for a future launch, the chief technology officer for SES said on Tuesday. “SES would have no problem in flying a re-used (rocket’s) first stage. If it’s flight-worthy, we’re happy,” SES’s Martin Halliwell told reporters at a pre-launch news conference.


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Are Genetic Weapons the Best Tools to Fight Zika Virus? (Op-Ed)

David O'Brochta has no conflicts of interest regarding the content of this piece. The unexpected risks unborn children appear to face from the Zika virus have drawn renewed attention to the importance of mosquito control in public health, but the Zika outbreak does not necessarily justify the immediate application of new — and relatively untested — mosquito controls. Mosquito control today involves a combination of chemical insecticide applications to kill adults and larvae, natural insecticides produced by Bacillus bacteria and elimination of mosquito habitats such as standing water.

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Young Adults Ignore Stroke Symptoms That Could Save Their Lives (Op-Ed)

Dr. David Liebeskind is director of outpatient stroke and neurovascular programs and director of the Neurovascular Imaging Research Core at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. He contributed this article to Live Science's  Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights


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10 Reasons California Is 'Greener' than New York (Op-Ed)

@deaton_jeremy. Deaton contributed this article, a response to " 10 Reasons NY is 'Greener' than CaliforniaExpert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.


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10 Reasons New York Is 'Greener' Than California (Op-Ed)

10 Reasons California Is 'Greener' Than New YorkExpert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.


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Scientists Isolate Antibodies That Fight Ebola

An Ebola survivor's blood and a new technique for isolating immune cells may have opened up new ways to combat the deadly virus.


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Dreamlike Seahorse Picture Snags Top Prize

An ethereal undersea image of a seahorse cradled by the motion of the ocean earned photographer Davide Lopresti the title, "Underwater Photographer of the Year 2016."


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Scientists Find 8 New Species of Spider with Whiplike Legs

A pair of elongated, whiplike legs that are actually sophisticated environment sensors distinguish an unusual arachnid known as the whip spider, also called the tailless whip scorpion. Scientists recently described eight new species of this long-legged spider that are native to Brazil, nearly doubling the number of known species in the genus


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'Space Archaeologists' Show Spike in Looting at Egypt's Ancient Sites

As economic and political instability rocked Egypt, looters increasingly plundered the country's archaeological sites, leaving holes across the nation's ancient landscapes. That's the trend reported today in the journal Antiquity by archaeologists who used satellite images to monitor sites in Egypt from 2002 to 2013. For the last several years, "space archaeologist" Sarah Parcak, an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has pored over satellite images to discover lost pyramids, tombs and cities buried in Egypt.


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Homesteading in Space: White House Science Office Seeks Sci-Fi Inspiration

Roughly 70 space scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, along with storytellers, artists, directors, and producers met to show their interest in science fiction and space exploration with a view toward future "homesteading" in space. Other co-sponsors were the National Academy of Sciences, Science & Entertainment Exchange, and the Museum of Science Fiction.


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Gorilla born by rare caesarean section delivery at British zoo

A baby gorilla has been delivered by a rare caesarean section at a British zoo in an operation performed by a hospital gynaecologist, the zoo said on Tuesday. Professor David Cahill, a gynaecologist at a nearby hospital who has delivered hundreds of babies by caesarean but never a gorilla, was drafted in to perform the operation, one of just a handful ever carried out worldwide. "I have since been back to visit Kera and the baby gorilla, it was wonderful to see them both doing so well." The baby girl gorilla weighed just over a kilogram (2 lbs 10oz) at birth 11 days ago.


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Volkswagen-Size Armored Mammal Is Armadillo Ancestor

A new genetic analysis of the glyptodont, an ancient armored creature the size of a Volkswagen Beetle, reveals that it's closely related to the modern-day armadillo. "The data sheds light on the familial relations of an enigmatic creature that has fascinated many but was always shrouded in mystery," study researcher Hendrik Poinar, an evolutionary geneticist and physical anthropologist, said in a statement. Now, a genetic analysis shows that the glyptodont is nestled deeply within the armadillo family and should be treated like a close relative, the researchers said.


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Thought-controlled prosthetic limbs possibly within reach, scientists say

By Jarni Blakkarly SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thought-controlled prosthetic limbs, wheelchairs and computers may be available within a decade, say Australian scientists who are planning to conduct human trials next year on a high-tech implant that can pick up and transmit signals from the brain.    Animals have already been tested with the device, called a stentrode, which is the size of a matchstick and planted inside a blood vessel near the brain. "The big breakthrough is that we now have a minimally invasive brain-computer interface device which is potentially practical for long-term use," said Terry O’Brien, head of medicine at the Department of Medicine and Neurology at the University of Melbourne. The current method for accessing brain signals requires complex open-brain surgery and becomes less effective over several months, which means it is rarely applied, he said.


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Thought-controlled prosthetic limbs possibly within reach, scientists say

By Jarni Blakkarly SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thought-controlled prosthetic limbs, wheelchairs and computers may be available within a decade, say Australian scientists who are planning to conduct human trials next year on a high-tech implant that can pick up and transmit signals from the brain.    Animals have already been tested with the device, called a stentrode, which is the size of a matchstick and planted inside a blood vessel near the brain. "The big breakthrough is that we now have a minimally invasive brain-computer interface device which is potentially practical for long-term use," said Terry O’Brien, head of medicine at the Department of Medicine and Neurology at the University of Melbourne. The current method for accessing brain signals requires complex open-brain surgery and becomes less effective over several months, which means it is rarely applied, he said.


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