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Showing posts from January 7, 2016

World’s first passenger drone unveiled at CES

By Ben Gruber LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, UNITED STATES (REUTERS) - There are hundreds of drones competing for attention in Las Vegas at 2016 Consumer Electronics Show. This is the Ehang 184, the world's first passenger drone. The UAV is completely autonomous, relying on sensors and computers to navigate from take off to landing.

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Dinosaur Tracks Reveal Odd Mating Dance

An analysis of the newfound marks suggests they are the first known evidence of a type of mating display behavior known as "scraping," common in modern ground-nesting birds. Paleontologists found scores of these "scrapes," areas in the rock that were shallowly scarred by multiple scratch marks. Martin Lockley, co-author of the study and emeritus professor of geology at the University of Colorado, Denver, told Live Science that these scrape marks were unlike anything the scientists had seen before.


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Ötzi the Iceman May Have Suffered Stomach Bug

The famous Ötzi, a man murdered about 5,300 years ago in the Italian Alps, had what's now considered the world's oldest known case of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can cause ulcers and gastric cancer, a new study finds. It's unclear whether the ancient iceman did, in fact, have ulcers or gastric cancer because his stomach tissue didn't survive. Today, about half of the world's human population has H. pylori in their gut, but only one in 10 people develop a condition from the bacteria, the researchers said.


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Human imprint has thrust Earth into new geological epoch : study

By Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - The indelible imprint left by human beings on Earth has become so clear that it justifies naming a new geological epoch after mankind, experts said on Thursday. The dawn of the "Anthropocene" would signal the end of the Holocene epoch, considered to have begun 11,700 years ago at the end of the Ice Age. “Human activity is leaving a pervasive and persistent signature on Earth,” said a report in the journal Science by an international team led by Colin Waters of the British Geological Survey.

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Ebola Fight: Survivors' Blood Doesn’t Help, But Malaria Drug Might

Since the latest Ebola outbreak began, researchers have renewed their search for an effective way to fight the deadly virus. Now, a new study finds that giving Ebola patients a drug that is currently used to treat malaria may lower their risk of dying from the virus by almost one-third. Meanwhile, a separate study finds that treating Ebola patients with blood plasma taken from Ebola survivors does not lower their risk of death.

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Missing Zzzs: Sleep Problems Common for Single Parents, Women

Single parents get less sleep and have more sleep-related problems than adults in households with two parents and adults living without children, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests. "These results are not surprising," said Dr. Stuart Quan, a sleep medicine specialist and researcher at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, who was not involved in the research for this report.

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Not Your Grandma's Thermometer: 3 New Ways to Take Your Temperature

The simple task of taking your temperature is getting a new high-tech twist: Three companies recently announced "smart thermometers" that offer alternative ways to check this vital sign and send the data to a mobile device. It provides a temperature reading that corrects for ambient temperature and skin heat loss, according to Withings, the company that makes the gadget. Thermo transmits the temperature data by Wi-Fi or Bluetooth to an app on a user's smartphone.

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Africa takes fresh look at GMO crops as drought blights continent

By MacDonald Dzirutwe HARARE (Reuters) - A scorching drought in Southern Africa that led to widespread crop failure could nudge African nations to finally embrace genetically modified (GM) crops to improve harvests and reduce grain imports. The drought, which extends to South Africa, the continent's biggest maize producer, has been exacerbated by an El Nino weather pattern and follows dry spells last year that affected countries from Zimbabwe to Malawi. Aid agency Oxfam has said 10 million people, mostly in Africa, face hunger because of droughts and poor rains.


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Jurassic 10-Armed 'Squid' Were Speedy Swimmers

The fossils represent Acanthoteuthis, a genus of squid relatives that lived during the Jurassic period and measured between 9.8 and 15.7 inches (25 and 40 centimeters) long. Acanthoteuthis is a cephalopod, part of the ocean-dwelling group that includes modern octopus, squid and cuttlefish, with an evolutionary history spanning 500 million years. Acanthoteuthis belongs to a group of cephalopods called belemnites, which are particularly abundant in the fossil record — or at least a small part of them is.


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Da Vinci's Iconic Bridge Recreated in Ice

One of Leonardo da Vinci's most stunning engineering plans is getting a decidedly chilly welcome to the modern world. Students in the frigid hinterlands of Finland plan to recreate one of the Renaissance man's many iconic sketches: a massive stone bridge spanning the Bosphorus River. Leonardo da Vinci, who lived between 1452 and 1519, is perhaps most famous for painting the "Mona Lisa." But the polymath also made impressive contributions to the fields of astronomy, engineering and anatomy.


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Baby Sharks: Sand Tiger Nursery Spotted Off New York Coast

Shark tots just a few months old are making their way up the Atlantic coast to a nursery off New York, scientists have found. The sand tiger shark nursery, located near the shore of Long Island's Great South Bay, supports the juvenile animals, which range from just months old to 4 or 5 years old and measure 9 inches to 4 feet (23 centimeters to 1.2 meters) long, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society's New York Aquarium. "It's quite interesting, because this is sort of a resident population," said Jon Dohlin, vice president and director of the aquarium.


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