Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from November 12, 2015

Here’s How Many Americans Are Now Obese

Nearly 38 percent of U.S. adults are obese, according to the latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Between 2013 and 2014, 37.7 percent of U.S. adults had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, which is considered obese, according to a new CDC report. What is clear is that obesity rates have increased over the last decade.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1MFBpK8
via RO Water Filter

Woman in Africa Survives Double Whammy of Ebola, Stroke

A middle-age woman in Africa who became infected with Ebola suffered a stroke during her bout with the virus but managed to survive both maladies, according to a new report of her case. The woman's case suggests that Ebola complications could include stroke, but more research is needed to say for sure, the authors said. The woman, in her 40s or 50s, went to an Ebola treatment center in West Africa in January 2015, according to the case report.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1iYv1le
via RO Water Filter

Man's Rare Heart Disorder Went Unnoticed for 67 Years

The condition, known as a double-chambered right ventricle, is extremely uncommon, said Dr. Valeria Duarte, a cardiology fellow at the University of Florida who presented the case here today (Nov. 10) at a research meeting called the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Even among those who have it, it's "very, vey rare to diagnose it in adulthood," Duarte told Live Science. The man did indeed have another congenital defect that he was aware of — a condition called ventricular septal defect, which is a hole in the wall of the heart that separates the two lower chambers, or ventricles.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1lmHscg
via RO Water Filter

European scientists say weedkiller glyphosate unlikely to cause cancer

By Barbara Lewis BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Glyphosate is unlikely to cause cancer in humans, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) said on Thursday, and the agency proposed a higher limit on the daily amount of residue of the popular weed killer deemed safe if consumed. The EFSA advises EU policymakers and its conclusion could lead the 28-member European Union to renew approval for glyphosate, which was brought into use by Monsanto Co in the 1970s and is used in its top-selling product Roundup as well as in many other herbicides around the world. Environmental groups have been calling for a ban after the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization, said in March that glyphosate was "probably carcinogenic to humans".


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1PqQHVj
via RO Water Filter

Lone Star Flight Museum to Land Where NASA Astronaut Jets Take Off

HOUSTON — For 24 years, former astronaut Bonnie Dunbar came to Ellington Field to fly. On Monday (Nov. 9), she returned to the southeast Houston airport, the home to NASA's aircraft operations, to dig — in honor of the history, and future, of flight. Dunbar, who launched aboard five space shuttle missions between 1985 and 1998, was among the dignitaries who took up a shovel of dirt to symbolically break ground on the new site of the Lone Star Flight Museum.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1RRKSxX
via RO Water Filter

Mars' Lost Atmosphere: MAVEN Probe Scientist Explains New Finding

The MAVEN spacecraft recently revealed that Mars' once-thick atmosphere was stripped away by powerful solar activity at some time in its history. "MAVEN has been focused on trying to understand the changing Mars climate," Jakosky told Space.com. The new findings from MAVENshow that the Martian atmosphere was lost to space, with large amounts stripped away by strong solar activity — as opposed to the atmosphere going down into the soil.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1MEinDX
via RO Water Filter

Why the Pyramids Spawn So Many Wacky Theories

GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson stands by an odd theory he floated at a commencement address: that the Egyptian pyramids are not pharaohs' tombs, but ancient grain silos built by the biblical Joseph. Indeed, though the pyramids are some of the most well-researched ancient structures in the world, they have a long-standing tendency to attract crackpot theories. Like Carson, these people ignore massive amounts of contemporary evidence about the pyramids.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1NNjCl1
via RO Water Filter

Dog-Size Rats Once Lived Alongside Humans

Scientists on an expedition to the island nation of East Timor discovered fossils representing seven new species of giant rats, all larger than any species ever found. The biggest of them would have tipped the scales at 11 lbs. (5 kilograms), about 10 times as much as a modern rat, according to Julien Louys, a paleontologist and research fellow at the Australian National University, who presented the findings in October at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. Calling the dig sites fossil-rich would be an understatement, Louys told Live Science.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Y6HNhe
via RO Water Filter

Darwin's 'Origin of Species' Voted Most Influential Academic Book

Women's rights, the foundations of capitalism and the warping of space-time can all take a backseat to meticulous descriptions of long-beaked finches, at least if public opinion is any measure. A group of academic booksellers, publishers and librarians conducted the survey in advance of Academic Book Week in the United Kingdom. In Darwin's theory, species emerge through natural selection, where genetic changes lead some in a population to be more fit for their environment than their competitors.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1WOUnok
via RO Water Filter

Hoping to find life on other planets, astronomers start on giant Chile telescope

By Gram Slattery CERRO LAS CAMPANAS, Chile (Reuters) - Chilean President Michelle Bachelet put hammer to stone on an Andean mountaintop on Wednesday evening to mark the start of construction for one of the world's most advanced telescopes, an instrument that may help shed light on the possibility of life on distant planets. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), scheduled to be completed by 2024, will have a resolution 10 times that of the Hubble spacecraft. Such technology, astronomers say, will help humans determine how the universe formed and if planets hundreds of light years away could support life.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1MDqlNJ
via RO Water Filter

European scientific advisers say glyphosate unlikely to cause cancer

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on Thursday said glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto weedkiller Roundup, was unlikely to cause cancer in humans, but it proposed new controls on any residues in food. EFSA advises EU policymakers and its conclusion will be used by the European Commission to decide whether to extend the current approval period for glyphosate, which ends on Dec. 31. Environmental groups have been calling for a ban after the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization, said in March that glyphosate was "probably carcinogenic to humans".


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/20OgElz
via RO Water Filter

Ozone Hole Over Antarctica Nears Record-Breaking Size Again

The hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica is nearing record-breaking size again, scientists say. In fact, new observations show that the infamous "ozone hole" is currently larger than the entire continent of North America. Researchers at the German Aerospace Center are using Earth-observing satellites to monitor the protective ozone layer and recently reported that a large, nearly circular hole over Antarctica extends over an area measuring 26 million square km (10 million square miles).


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1RQBhHO
via RO Water Filter

How Robots Are Building a 3D-Printed Metal Bridge in Amsterdam

The quaint, cobblestoned city of Amsterdam is about to get a modern addition: a 3D-printed footbridge. The bridge will be constructed entirely by robots that can "print" complex steel objects in midair. The autonomous bots are like mechanical, torch-wielding welders that melt together layer upon layer of steel to form a solid object, said Tim Geurtjens, MX3D's co-founder and chief technology officer.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1GYhsxU
via RO Water Filter

Part of Pluto's Heart Was 'Born Yesterday'

Pluto has a surprisingly youthful heart — the smooth, round region on the dwarf planet'ssurface is no more than 10 million years old, a blink of an eye in the 4.5-billion-year lifetime of the solar system. The large,western lobe of the "heart" on Pluto's surface is also known as Sputnik Planum, and it is strikingly free of craters. Researchers with NASA's New Horizons mission said this is surprising, because such processes require an internal heat source, which is often lost in small bodies like Pluto.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1iWKTEE
via RO Water Filter

Strategic Command Issues Statement on Trident Missile Test that Freaked Out the West Coast

With images like these, it's no wonder California — not to mention the Twittersphere — freaked out Saturday evening when an unannounced test of a submarine-launched Trident missile lit up the evening sky. Photographer Porter Tinsley and her wife were on the shore of California's desolate Salton Sea taking long exposures and time lapses with three different cameras when they witnessed what they thought at the time was a chemical or nuclear weapon detonating over Los Angeles two and a half hours to the west. The test occurred the same day U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, speaking at the Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California, called out Russia for engaging in "challenging activities" at sea, in the air, in space and cyberspace.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1iWKTEA
via RO Water Filter

Robot salamander helping scientists unlock spinal secrets

By Matthew Stock A robotic salamander that can replicate the amphibian's movement to an unprecedented degree of accuracy has been built by robotic engineers in Switzerland. Called Pleurobot, it can reproduce the many postures and positions of a real salamander, and can even swim underwater. Researchers hope it will give neuroscientists an important new tool for further understanding the way the nervous system co-ordinates movement in vertebrates.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1PDRiBL
via RO Water Filter

Germany, U.S. in hot pursuit of 'messenger' drug molecules

In theory, the promise of mRNA is enormous, ranging from cancer to infectious diseases to heart and kidney disorders, since it could be used to tackle the 80 percent of proteins that are difficult to affect with existing medicines. Despite a recent sell-off in biotech stocks, sparked by U.S. Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's threat to crack down on drug pricing, enthusiasm for mRNA, is rising. Privately-held CureVac in the university town of Tuebingen, which already has backing from Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates thanks to its vaccine work, last week raised $110 million from new investors, valuing it at $1.6 billion.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Y64WAw
via RO Water Filter

Astronomers discover new distant object in the solar system

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Astronomers have discovered what appears to be a miniature planet that is the most distant body ever found in the solar system, scientists said on Wednesday. "We can't really classify the object yet, as we don't know its orbit," said Scott Sheppard, an astronomer with the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. "We only just found this object a few weeks ago." Based on its reflectivity, scientists believe the icy body, known as V774101, is between 300 and 600 miles (500 to 1,000 km) in diameter, roughly half the size of Pluto. Currently, the most distant planet-like bodies in the solar system are Sedna, discovered in 2003, and VP113, discovered in 2012.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1lll3Mu
via RO Water Filter