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Showing posts from November 3, 2015

NASA must take more care about rocket parts after accident: probe

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla (Reuters) - - Independent NASA accident investigators said the U.S. space agency should “perform a greater level of due diligence for major system components” in rockets that deliver cargo to the International Space Station following a 2014 explosion. The recommendation came in the investigators' report on the explosion of Orbital ATK's Antares rocket that destroyed a load of cargo for the space station. It may spur calls for more oversight of NASA's use of commercial contracts to deliver cargo - and soon crew members - to the space station.


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Ultrasonic bubbles give cold water bug-killing cleaning power

By Matthew Stock A hand-held device that infuses a gentle stream of regular cold water with ultrasound to turn it into a highly effective cleaning tool has been developed by British scientists, who say it could reduce dependence on traditional detergents and help combat anti-microbial resistance. The device, known as Starstream, passes a gentle stream of water through a nozzle that generates ultrasound and bubbles.

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Newfound Moon Craters Point to Asteroid Puzzle

Newfound lunar craters suggest that asteroids that smashed into the moon long ago were very different from the ones that now occupy the asteroid belt, researchers say. Scientists think swarms of asteroids and comets pummeled Earth, the moon and the other worlds of the inner solar system during an era known as the Late Heavy Bombardment about 4.1 billion to 3.8 billion years ago. The many giant, round craters known as lunar basins that pockmark the moon's surface now stand as mute testimony to this violent time.


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Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson Celebrate 35 Years of The Planetary Society

Led by Bill Nye "The Science Guy," with help from astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, space exploration advocacy organization The Planetary Society recently celebrated its 35th anniversary and the opening of its new headquarters in Pasadena, California. Founded in 1980 by a group of scientists that included famed astronomer and science popularizer Carl Sagan, the nonprofit Planetary Society is "the largest and most influential public space organization group on Earth," according to its website. In 2010, Nye took the job of chief executive officer for the organization.


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Rare Earthquake Trio Shakes Phoenix: What Happened?

A rare trio of earthquakes shook central Arizona Sunday (Nov. 1), startling residents in Phoenix and the surrounding areas. It was preceded by a magnitude-3.2 foreshock at 8:59 p.m. and was followed by a magnitude-4.0 aftershock at 11:49 p.m. Smaller aftershocks may follow, said Ryan Porter, a seismologist at Northern Arizona University. Earthquakes are "pretty uncommon for Arizona," Porter told Live Science.


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Can Rocker Grace Potter Induce the 'Overview Effect'? (Video)

Steve Spaleta, Space.com senior producer, and Dave Brody, Space.com executive producer, contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. But traveling to space may not be the only way to achieve a state of higher consciousness, according to Grammy-nominated musician Grace Potter, a self-avowed science and space enthusiast. Potter recently told Space.com that she experiences "a sense of universality" while performing with her band on some of the world's largest stages.


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When Robots Colonize the Cosmos, Will They Be Conscious? (Op-Ed)

Robert Lawrence Kuhn is the creator, writer and host of "Closer to Truth," a public television series and online resource that features the world's leading thinkers exploring humanity's deepest questions. Kuhn is co-editor with John Leslie, of "The Mystery of Existence: Why Is There Anything at All?" (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013).

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Planets on Parade in the November Sky: How and When to See Them

To entice you out of your warm bed are Venus, Jupiter and Mars, along with a lovely crescent moon early in the month. The brightest stars are equal to first or zero magnitude, while the very brightest objects (Venus, the moon and the sun) are of negative magnitude. Today (Nov. 3), Venus is the dazzling "Morning Star," rising more than 3.5 hours before sunup all month (more than 2 hours before the first light of dawn).


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As scientists worry about warming world, US public doesn't

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are hot but not too bothered by global warming.


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Are Americans Eating Healthier? Take This Study with a Grain of Salt

People in the United States have been eating healthier — in fact, a new study finds that improved diets have prevented 1.1 million premature deaths over a 14-year period. However, the overall quality of the American diet remains poor, the researchers said. In the study, the researchers looked at trends in people's diets, pulling data from another study of about 34,000 U.S. adults who were each surveyed twice between 1999 and 2012.The researchers applied a scoring system to the participants' diets called the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010, which takes into account people's intake of fruit, vegetables and whole grains, as well as their consumption of unhealthy foods such as sugar-sweetened beverages and processed meats.

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Codswallop! Ancient British 'Sea Monster' Mislabeled for 200 Years

"There were some rich gentry in the area who would buy them from quarrymen, prepare them and put them in these big wooden frames," said study co-researcher Judy Massare, a professor of geology at SUNY College at Brockport in New York. At the time, fossil experts assigned the Street specimens to the same species — Ichthyosaurus communis, a common species found in rock layers dating to the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic periods in Street, as well as elsewhere in the United Kingdom. The project began when Dean Lomax, a paleontologist at the University of Manchester, found an ichthyosaur skeleton in the collections of the Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery in the United Kingdom.


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Tomb Tells Tale of Family Executed by China's 1st Female Emperor

A 1,300-year-old tomb, discovered in Xi'an city, China, holds the bones of a man who helped the nation's only female emperor rise to power. The epitaphs in the tomb describe how she then executed him and his entire family. Located within a cave, the tomb contains the remains of Yan Shiwei and his wife, Lady Pei.


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How a Family Dog May Lower a Child's Asthma Risk

Children who are raised in households with dogs or farm animals during their first year of life may have a lower risk of asthma a few years later, a new study suggests. Among the school-age kids in the study, those who had been exposed to dogs during their first year of life were 13 percent less likely to have asthma at age 6, compared with the school-age kids who had not been exposed to dogs in their first year of life, the researchers found. Based on the new findings, researchers can confidently "say that Swedish children with dogs in their homes are at lower risk of asthma at age 6, and that this risk reduction is seen also in children to parents with asthma," said study author Tove Fall, an associate professor of Uppsala University in Sweden.

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Hypersonic Jet Could Cross the Atlantic in 30 Minutes (Someday)

One imaginative inventor has developed a concept plane that could take passengers across the pond in just 30 minutes — at least in theory. The aircraft concept, dubbed the Skreemr, is the brainchild of Charles Bombardier, an engineer and inventor who writes about his futuristic prototype designs in the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail. If such a jet were ever built, it would be five times faster than the Concorde, a now-retired supersonic passenger jet that once soared through the sky at speeds reaching Mach 2.04 (more than twice the speed of sound, at 1,565 mph, or 2,519 km/h).

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Physiology Pioneer's Nobel Prize Sells for Nearly $800,000

In 1963, a British biophysicist won a shiny Nobel Prize medal for discovering how the nerve cells of a giant squid generate an electrical pulse when stimulated. The Nobel Prize medal, sold by Nate D. Sanders Auctions in Los Angeles, belonged to Alan Lloyd Hodgkin, who helped pioneer research on the central nervous system. Hodgkin was awarded the prize in physiology or medicine along with his colleagues Andrew Fielding Huxley and John Eccles.


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Space Station Crew Celebrates 15-Year Streak of Humans in Orbit

Yesterday (Nov. 2) marked 15 years since humans took up permanent residence in the International Space Station, and the six crewmembers on board took some time to talk about what the station means for the future of human spaceflight, and how it's holding up after more than one and a half decades in space. Construction began on the $100 billion International Space Station in 1998, with the launch of the Russian Zarya module. "We've learned a lot from this space station that is very, very important to our future exploration beyond our local space environment," said NASA astronaut Scott Kelly during the news conference yesterday.


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Space revolution hatching in a New Zealand paddock

By Charlotte Greenfield AUCKLAND, New Zealand (Reuters) - The next revolution in space, making humdrum what was long the special preserve of tax-funded giants like NASA, will be launching next year from a paddock in New Zealand’s remote South Island. The rocket launch range is not just New Zealand's first of any kind, but also the world's first private launch range, and the rocket, designed by Rocket Lab, one of a growing number of businesses aiming to slash the cost of getting into space, will be powered by a 3D-printed rocket engine - another first. The 16-meter carbon-cased rocket being assembled in a small hangar near Auckland Airport will weigh just 1,190 kilograms, and with fuel and payload will be only about a third the weight of SpaceX's Falcon 1, the first privately developed launch vehicle to go into orbit back in 2008.


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Cannibal Tyrannosaurs: Proof May Be in a Gnawed Bone

Sixty-six million years ago, a tyrannosaur may have sunk its sharp and serrated teeth into the bones of another tyrannosaur, new research suggests. The gnawed bone may provide evidence that tyrannosaurs ate their own kind, the researchers said. "We were out in Wyoming digging up dinosaurs in the Lance Formation," paleontologist Matthew McLain of Loma Linda University in California said in a statement.


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