Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from October 10, 2015

Ice Age Mammoth Bones Discovered on Michigan Farm

Two Michigan farmers made an unexpected discovery in a wheat field last week: the ice-age bones of a mammoth that was likely slaughtered by ancient humans. An excavation and analysis of the bones suggest they come from an adult male mammoth that had an unlucky end. "We think that humans were here and may have butchered and stashed the meat [in a pond] so that they could come back later for it," Daniel Fisher, a University of Michigan paleontologist who led the excavation, said in a statement.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1LxdhnX
via RO Water Filter

Killer Show! Murder Weapons and Death Masks Star in New Exhibit

A shovel used to bury the body of a murder victim in 1910, an antique-looking gun that fired a shot at Queen Victoria in 1840 (it missed) and death masks from convicted criminals: These are among the strange and grisly artifacts associated with some of the most notorious crimes in recent British history. And they are now on display in the "Crime Museum Uncovered" exhibit that opens today (Oct. 9) at the Museum of London. The exhibit's storied artifacts are on loan from the Crime Museum — a private gallery of objects retained from prisoners and crime scenes, which is located at the Metropolitan Police headquarters at New Scotland Yard in London.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1FXG6Oq
via RO Water Filter

Marble Caves and Neolithic Stones Shine in UK Photo Contest

On a cold, drizzly afternoon, Brent Bouwsema drove with his wife and two children to photograph some of the oldest stones in the British Isles. Geologists think the Callanish Stones, which are made of an ancient type of rock called Lewisian gneiss, were built in the Neolithic period about 5,000 years ago. Bouwsema took a photo of the moss-covered pillars, and ended up as one of the winners of the "100 Great Geosites" photography contest, The Geological Society of London announced today (Oct. 9).


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Lxdh7z
via RO Water Filter

Nobel laureate chemist Richard Heck, 84, dies in Manila

American chemist and Nobel laureate Richard Heck died in Manila on Saturday after years of illnesses that left him almost penniless, relatives of his Filipina wife said on Saturday. Heck, 84, along with Japanese Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki, won the Nobel prize in chemistry in 2010 for inventing new ways to bind carbon atoms that were used in research to fight cancer and produce thin computer screens.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Oqum9V
via RO Water Filter

Scientists predict drier Horn of Africa as climate warms

By Megan Rowling BARCELONA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The Horn of Africa is becoming drier in step with global warming, researchers said on Friday, contradicting some climate models predicting rainier weather patterns in a region that has suffered frequent food crises linked to drought. A new study using a sediment core extracted from the Gulf of Aden found the East African region covering Somalia, Djibouti and Ethiopia has dried at an unusually fast rate over the past century. Lead author Jessica Tierney, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation the research team was confident the drying was linked to rising emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases, and was expected to continue as the region heats up further.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1jkhy7D
via RO Water Filter