Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from September 15, 2015

U.S. universities lead in innovation, Asia a rising power

By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - U.S. universities lead the world in scientific innovation but face strong competition from Asian rivals with close ties to industry, according to a detailed analysis of academic papers and patent filings. Stanford alumni have gone on to create some of the world's biggest technology companies, including Hewlett-Packard, Yahoo and Google. The top nine places are all taken by U.S. schools, with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University ranked second and third.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1FeL7S7
via RO Water Filter

Aerojet Rocketdyne says new AR-1 engine timetable could slip

By Andrea Shalal NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. (Reuters) - Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings Inc on Tuesday said it expected to complete its new AR-1 rocket engine by 2019 to replace a soon-to-be banned Russian engine, but the date could slip if it does not receive enough U.S. government funding. Aerojet Vice President Julie Van Kleeck declined comment on reports that Aerojet has offered $2 billion to acquire United Launch Alliance (ULA), a 50-50 rocket launch venture of Lockheed Martin Corp and Boeing Co. Analysts say the bid is a strategic move by Aerojet to shut out rival Blue Origin, a company owned by Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos, that is developing a new engine favored by ULA for use in its new Vulcan rocket.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Odu3yN
via RO Water Filter

Skip the Anti-Bacterial Soap: Regular Suds Work Just as Well

Regular soap is just as effective as anti-bacterial soap at getting rid of germs through hand washing, a new study finds. In both the lab and the real-life trials, regular soap performed just as well as anti-bacterial soap, which contained the controversial chemical triclosan, according to the study from researchers in South Korea, published online today (Sept. 15) in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. "This study shows that presence of antiseptic ingredients (in this case, triclosan) in soap does not always guarantee higher anti-microbial efficacy during hand washing," the study's senior author, Min-Suk Rhee, a researcher of food bioscience and technology at Korea University in Seoul, South Korea, told Live Science in an email.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1MacEUp
via RO Water Filter

Kids May See Better If They Play Outside

Children who spend more time outdoors may have a lower risk of becoming nearsighted, new research suggests. The scientists found that the kids who had been instructed to spend more time outdoors over three years were 23 percent less likely to develop nearsightedness during this time than those who had not been instructed to spend more time outdoors. Although the study was conducted in China, the results likely apply to children elsewhere, too, said study author Dr. Mingguang He, of the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, in Guangzhou.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1UTGtQS
via RO Water Filter

Amazon's Jeff Bezos plans rocket plant, launch pad in Florida

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Amazon founder Jeff Bezos unveiled plans on Tuesday to build a rocket manufacturing plant and launch site in Florida to better compete with fellow billionaires using their fortunes and tech prowess to open a new frontier in human space travel and exploration. Bezos’ space startup, Blue Origin, intends to invest more than $200 million to build the rocket manufacturing facility adjacent to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The rockets will fly from a refurbished launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, located just south of the NASA spaceport.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1iMg7io
via RO Water Filter

Hidden Superchain of Volcanoes Discovered in Australia

Scientists have just found the world's longest chain of volcanoes on a continent, hiding in plain sight. The newly discovered Australian volcano chain isn't a complete surprise, though: Geologists have long known of small, separate chains of volcanic activity on the island continent. That 1,240-mile-long (2,000 kilometers) chain of fire spanned most of eastern Australia, from Hillsborough in the north, where rainforest meets the Great Barrier Reef, to the island of Tasmania in the south.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1NuTF8S
via RO Water Filter

Creepy Surprise: Medieval Skeleton Discovered Under Uprooted Tree

When an old beech tree toppled over during winter storms in Ireland this year, a skeletal surprise was hiding in the gigantic mass of roots pulled from the ground: the remains of a medieval boy. The 215-year-old tree was uprooted in May in Collooney, a town in the county of Sligo, on the northwest coast of Ireland. Preliminary analyses of the bones by osteoarchaeologist Linda Lynch and others at Sligo-Leitrim Archaeological Services (SLAS), a private consultancy, revealed the remains of a young man who was between 17 and 20 years old when he died.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1LwqDkT
via RO Water Filter

Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Will Launch Rockets and Spaceships from Florida

Jeff Bezos, the billionaire founder of private spaceflight company Blue Origin and founder and CEO of Amazon.com, announced today that Blue Origin will make Florida's Space Coast its home port for reusable rocket launches. Blue Origin, which Bezos founded in 2000, will launch rockets and spacecraft from Launch Complex 36 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. "As a kid, I was inspired by the giant Saturn V missions that roared to life from these very shores," Bezos said during the announcement here today (Sept. 15).


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1KdQdNx
via RO Water Filter

Happy? Sad? Breastfeeding May Affect Babies' Awareness of Social Cues

The researchers found that among the 44 babies in the study who had a certain genotype of the gene CD38, called the CC genotype, those who had been exclusively breastfed for the longest time tended to look longer at happy eyes, and for less time at angry eyes, compared with infants who had been exclusively breastfed for a shorter time. Most mothers there are entitled to a one-year-long paid maternity leave, making it easier for moms to breastfeed if they choose to, said study author Tobias Grossmann of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. For the babies in the study who didn't have this CC genotype, the length of time they were breastfed was not linked with how long they looked at the emotional faces, according to the study.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1OcroWi
via RO Water Filter

Light-Bulb Moment: Doctors Find True Cause of Toddler's Cough

The doctors had originally guessed that the item inside the 15-month-old girl's chest was her grandmother's hairpin, but the U-shaped object seen on the child's chest X-ray turned out to be an LED bulb, perhaps from one of the toddler's toys, according to a new report of the girl's case published online Aug. 26 in the journal BMJ Case Reports. The object had lodged at the end of the girl's windpipe, close to the main passageway leading into her right lung, said Dr. Kenneth Wong, a pediatric surgeon at Queen Mary Hospital in Hong Kong, who co-authored the case report. Children between ages 1 and 3 are particularly vulnerable to swallowing small objects because they have a tendency to put things in their mouths, and may not have teeth capable of chewing the object before it slides down their throat, according to the case report.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1ie5jJc
via RO Water Filter

Graphene Is Turned into Zero-Resistance Wonder Material

Atom-thin layers of carbon can be turned into superconductors — extraordinary materials that conduct electricity without dissipating energy, physicists say. The sheets are known as graphene, and they are made of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb pattern. Graphene is extraordinarily strong — about 200 times stronger than steel by weight.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1QCFJtv
via RO Water Filter

New Antenna Could Give Mars Rovers a Direct Line to Earth

Talking to rovers on the surface of Mars could become much easier, thanks to a new type of antenna that would send messages directly between the robotic explorers and Earth. The new antenna design would also dramatically increase the available communication time between Red Planet rovers and Earth, according to a statement from the University of California at Los Angeles. The new design could be a major boost for future missions, such as NASA's Mars 2020 rover, scheduled to begin its journey to Mars in 2020.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Y7CuiK
via RO Water Filter

Halfway Home: One-Year Space Crew Rallies for 6 More Months Off Earth

Two space travelers on the International Space Station are entering rarely tread territory as they pass the six-month mark in a yearlong stay in orbit. American astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have been living on the space station for about six months and won't be going home for another half-year. A year is a long time," Kelly told reporters during an in-flight interview on Sept. 8.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1M8Luxn
via RO Water Filter

NASA's Osiris-Rex Asteroid Mission Kickstarts Outreach Budget With Card Game

The head of NASA's Osiris-Rex asteroid sample-return probe plans to crowdfund a public outreach budget for the mission on Kickstarter by selling a card game in which players compete to build their own space missions. The game, Xtronaut, was designed by Dante Lauretta, a University of Arizona Tucson professor and principal investigator for Osiris-Rex: A roughly $1 billion NASA New Frontiers mission set to launch in September 2016 and return an asteroid sample to Earth in 2023. NASA missions historically reserved a slice of their budgets for education and public outreach, or EPO: Essentially, promoting the mission to the public through experts directly involved with the program. However, Osiris-Rex's EPO budget got deleted in 2013 as part of a broader federal policy change initiated that year to consolidate U.S. education spending within the Department of Education.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1Oc9TVX
via RO Water Filter

Ashley Madison Scandal: Science Reveals 2 Main Reasons People Cheat

We may never know exactly what drove millions of men and women in committed relationships to log on to AshleyMadison.com to find lovers, but most cheaters fall into two categories, science shows. Upward of 30 million Ashley Madison accounts may sound like a lot (and some of those accounts may be fake "robot" accounts), but about 1 in 5 men and women in the United States cheat, according to a study published in 2011 in the Archives of Sexual Behavior. "There's almost as many different reasons for why people cheat as there are people," said Pepper Schwartz, a professor of sociology at the University of Washington and co-author of "Snap Strategies for Couples: 40 Fast Fixes for Everyday Relationship Pitfalls" (Seal Press, 2015).

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1MoQnp3
via RO Water Filter

Another Reason Not to Sit for Too Long: Liver Disease

Sitting for long periods has been linked to obesity, diabetes and heart disease — and now there's new evidence that it may also increase the risk of liver disease, according to a new study from South Korea. In the study, researchers found that people who sat for 10 or more hours daily had a 9 percent greater risk of developing a condition called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) than those who spent less than five hours a day sitting. Physical activity also played a role in people's risk of NAFLD: Those who were physically active were 20 percent less likely to develop the disease compared with those who were inactive, according to the study published today (Sept. 15) in the Journal of Hepatology.

from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1OsIM8b
via RO Water Filter

Nicole Kidman returns to London in tale of overlooked DNA scientist

By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Nicole Kidman, whose last appearance on stage in London was described by one reviewer as "pure theatrical Viagra", has captivated audiences again with her performance as the sidelined scientist who helped unlock the secret of DNA. The Oscar-winning actor's portrait of Rosalind Franklin, who battles sexism in male-dominated 1950s Britain in Anna Ziegler's play "Photograph 51", opened to glowing reviews on Monday. Kidman's return to the London stage had been eagerly awaited following her debut here 17 years ago in David Hare's "The Blue Room", a play about a chain of sexual encounters.


from Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://ift.tt/1EZGo71
via RO Water Filter